Tag Archives: Unemployment

Plus ça change


This week on Facebook: My five reprises this week reflect the epigram Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. The epigram is probably familiar to most of my generation and needs no translation (Google it), but perhaps some of my family may read my reflections so it was a somewhat cynical remark that translates as, “The more things change, the more they stay the same”. Jean Baptiste Alphonse Karr (1808-1890) wrote this epigram in the January 1849 issue of Les Guêpes (“The Wasps”), the year following the European 1848 Revolutions.  A number of broadsheets¹ at the time extolled or attacked the presidential candidates General Cavaignac and (most of them) Louis-Napoleon, both of whom Karr described as Les Guêpes.

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Malthus & Growth


This week on Facebook: In simple terms the Malthusian Trap predicts that population growth will always reach the point where it curtails human progress and leads to its inevitable decline. I have followed articles on the theory of population growth and noticed that generally they are more optimistic than I am about the societal effect of such growth. The focus of most articles is on the ability to be innovative in finding solutions to a growing global population. In doing so the conclusions drawn make a lot of undefined assumptions, with the main one being that of ignoring the indigent.   Read more of this post

Inequality & Gini Lorenz


This week on Facebook: An acquaintance found himself embroiled in discussions about (essentially) wealth distribution in the developed and developing word. This is an area fraught with statistical analysis — mostly written in support of a particular issue — and usually extremely biased. Read more of this post

Free Trade — not so transparent


This week on Facebook I intended to post some links on the age of transparency. This interest in transparency was prompted by a comment on a previous post, perhaps itself prompted by the recent revelations of the Panama Papers. Papers which raised great cries of indignation around the world and which will inevitably lead to less transparency in regard to their revelations. My web research for articles on transparency led me to conclude that we are living in an age of pseudo transparency, in which administrations, whatever their political hue, will constantly seek greater control over the pseudo transparency they permit. Articles on transparency are not easy to find, in fact the opposite is the case, there is a concerted effort to counteract and, where possible, suppress articles in the social media that could lead to any opposition an administration’s viewpoint. Read more of this post

2015 Election Year


In The debt we’re in (Jan 2011) I referred to a 2009 report by Brooks Newmark MP with the title The Hidden Debt Bombshell. In it Newmark claimed that the true level of government debt was £2,200 billion and not £805 billion as was reported by the Office for National Statistics. It’s interesting that Newmark has not written a similar report in the run-up to this years general election. However I can understand why. Read more of this post

Beggars are coming to town.


The Tudor Age (1485 – 1603), especially during the reign of Henry VIII, was a period of great social upheaval. The Act of Supremacy coupled with the dissolution of the monasteries, the enclosures of common land and the great debasement, affected all strata of English society.  The wealth of English landowners vastly increased, as did the size of their farms and estates, but the effect on those not owning land and the hired labour, especially in rural communities, was catastrophic. Vagrancy became endemic as a largely self-sufficient, if often subsistent, rural culture effectively ended. The rural dispossessed swelled the bands of those regarded as idle vagabonds, who roamed the country plaguing all communities in England. Crime increased, as did the indigent population of English towns and cities. The punishments for vagrancy introduced after the Peasants Revolt of 1381, and meted out to the indigent considered to be deliberately indolent, were made even harsher. Read more of this post

Gold Plated EU Regulations


‘UK laws and the EU – A myth?’ dealt with claims that EU Directives and EU Regulations were now responsible for a large percentage of UK law. Claims that have now become UK lore. Regardless of this, they must have some influence on UK trade and commerce.

Gold-plating is a term used in European Union law to describe the incorrect transposition of a European directive.

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Cassandra’s Curse


I am not an economist or financial advisor,  nor do I claim to write with any ‘personal professional authority’. However, I do write on economics and financial issues gleaned from – and linked to – professional sources. Writings which, perhaps, I should post as Cassandra  – a metaphor for cases of valid alarms that are disbelieved. Read more of this post

A quest for the ‘Iron Lady’.


Lady Thatcher is dead but not – at least metaphorically – buried, still demonised by the hard left left, still lionized by the hard right, still a source of great political and economic controversy. This generation is confronted by very different problems: the straitjacket of prolonged austerity, the lack of accountability in corporate power, the over-dominance of finance, a grossly unjust system of remuneration and the destruction of the public realm.

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National Distress (Hansard 1842)


In the House of Lords on May 26 1842, when debating The Queen’s letter, the following statement regarding national distress was made by Lord Kinnaird:

Stockport, in Cheshire, is one of the principal seats of the cotton manufacture, and a large portion of its population is dependent on that manufacture for support. During the last three years many failures among the mill-owners have occurred; but distress among the working people did not assume a very aggravated form until within the last eight months; since that time a large number of the manufacturing workmen, accustomed to constant industry, have been reduced by the stoppage of mills to want of employment, and to a dependence on legal or voluntary alms. Read more of this post

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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