Tag Archives: The Telegraph

Lessons in Mandarin


Sunday on Facebook: Last week I posted a video from an interview with Zhang Weiwei on his book ‘The China Wave’ and an article from Zhang Weiwei on ‘Meritocracy versus Democracy’. They were both very informative, especially in promoting the idealism of the Chinese meritocratic system of government. I concluded that public administration in a meritocratic system of government differs very little from that of a demos driven democratic system, the differences lying in their notional definitions  democracy.

Written four years ago the following reprise is not entirely tongue in cheek but may well represent my innate cynicism that irrespective of the politics represented ‘mandarin‘, is not the purview of the Chinese. The following ‘Lessons in Mandarin’, may point to the inscrutability and clear consciousness of all (supposedly meaningful) exchanges.

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Cash is subversive (2)


The following is a brief extract from ‘Big Brother Loves You!’ by Detlev Schlichter in which he rails against fiat money and the creation of debt something that I touched on in A Universal Debt. Commenting on the trend towards interventionist policies and assertive state action, The Economist and the Financial Times talk of the trend towards ‘repression’ and ‘national capitalism’ in crisis management. The public believe that greedy bankers and ‘unfettered capitalism’ brought about this crisis. Yet cheap credit through state fiat money and the systematic subsidisation of the housing market, are not features of the free market but of politics. Read more of this post

A letter to Dorothy Dix — Christmas 2017


Letter to Dorothy Dix

I am a sailor in the New Zealand Navy. My parents live in Whangarei and my brother-in-law is living in Melbourne. My father and mother have been busted for drug running and they depend on my two sisters, who are prostitutes, for a living.

My only brother is serving a life sentence in jail on conviction of rape and murder, and my uncle is a High Court Judge who takes bribes. My other uncle is on trial for lighting fires in a National Park which burnt down 93 houses.

I am in love with a Thai prostitute who solicits around the Auckland wharves. She says she loves me, but she knows nothing about my family background. We intend to marry as soon as her illnesses clear up. Me being white does not bother her at all. When I get out of the Navy we will open a brothel in Hamilton and my two sisters will work there to keep the business in the family.

My problem is that I want to marry this girl and have an entirely open and honest relationship with her. The burning question is whether I should tell her that I have a brother-in-law who lives in Melbourne? Read more of this post

2016 July CWG Comments/Reviews/Thoughts


Having set the theme for this month I was surprised by the diversity of its interpretation (perhaps the intentional use of ‘time displacement’ replacing ‘time travel’ to encourage non sci-fi writer actually worked). I’m especially grateful to Capucin for dissecting the theme so skilfully and incorporating it into a non sci-fi story and Seadams who, with ExpatAngie, Colmore and others, added very non sci-fi themes. It seems that all is fair in love and fiction. Read more of this post

2016 January — Comments/Reviews/Thoughts


It’s the time of year when the garden beckons, not the least to repair the damage caused by the storm. Meanwhile: I’m sure that it isn’t true or at its worst, a very bad generalisation, to think that writers consistently find it easy to write in a particular style. However, there are a number of unique styles amongst these stories that are always engaging and wide ranging in their themes. Read more of this post

March 2015 Critique/Review/Thoughts


At our monthly pie and a pint meeting, my friend and I discuss — amongst other things — books, creative writing, writing groups, the internet environment, critiquing and quality in writing. A couple of years ago he lent me a book by Robert Rankin, my initial reaction to Rankin was that his books were badly written in that they were grammatically incorrect (in modern grammar usage I’m no longer sure that’s true). On reflection I concluded that I was wrong about Rankin, some people, my friend included, find a quality in his works.

So why should literature be any different from other art forms? Why should literature be bound by any rules, if the style in which someone has chosen to write pleases someone else? My grandchildren can read and write … in common with Chester’s Josie. Their Facebook entries are hardly quality prose … then, perhaps, a clue may be found in Mallory Ortberg’s Texts From Jane Eyre. Of course there are constraints like: ‘Did I enjoy reading it?’ and somewhere in this enjoyment, either consciously or unconsciously, there is an  assessment of quality. That abstract and personal assessment, which always sends me back to Zen and the 17th Chapter.

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February 2015 Critique/Review/Thoughts


Yet another difficult month for making choices, the discussion helped in making me think a lot about how difficult it must be to co-ordinate this group and especially to ‘score’ the contributions. I try to group the entries (romance, drama, etc) but this isn’t easy as such simplification doesn’t necessarily provide the key to what may be the contributor’s intent. Read more of this post

January 2015 Review/Critique


My choice has become one of personal preference, in effect which stories gave me the most reading pleasure. That is not to say that the other stories were not an enjoyable read, but I had to make a choice. One that was not made on the quality and presentation of a story, that would have meant too many choices, and so my list is heavily biased. Read more of this post

OH NO! Not another blog on blogging!


When I first began blogging there seemed to be a continual cry of, OH NO! Not another blog on blogging!  My search for a ‘decent’ site had led me to the now defunct My Telegraph website where I decided to blog. I thought the site often treated newcomers in a very unfriendly manner, certainly not in any way that could be termed ‘an honest critique’ of their blog content or its presentation.

Some five or more years later, the world has moved on. Amateur bloggers like myself who now know how the professional media have commandeered the internet – if they’re wise – have given up any delusions of grandeur that they may have held, or are captives of that media. Still, blogging does give voice to the ‘common man’ (I’m sure you ladies know my intent) and both the professional media and amateur bloggers are learning to use ‘blogs’ effectively. So! Cue Aaron Copland and Fanfare for the Common Man (article). Read more of this post

HO – HO


A close friend of mine has a grandson diagnosed as an Aspie, having become more enlightened on Aspberger’s Syndrome, I was prompted to post a critique of the TV programme Chasing Shadows.

Whilst researching material for this critique I came across a web site, written by an Angry Autie  who had posted an amusing piece with the title: The Institute for the Study of the Neurologically Typical. Read more of this post

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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