Tag Archives: The Telegraph

2016 July CWG Comments/Reviews/Thoughts


Having set the theme for this month I was surprised by the diversity of its interpretation (perhaps the intentional use of ‘time displacement’ replacing ‘time travel’ to encourage non sci-fi writer actually worked). I’m especially grateful to Capucin for dissecting the theme so skilfully and incorporating it into a non sci-fi story and Seadams who, with ExpatAngie, Colmore and others, added very non sci-fi themes. It seems that all is fair in love and fiction. Read more of this post

2016 January — Comments/Reviews/Thoughts


It’s the time of year when the garden beckons, not the least to repair the damage caused by the storm. Meanwhile: I’m sure that it isn’t true or at its worst, a very bad generalisation, to think that writers consistently find it easy to write in a particular style. However, there are a number of unique styles amongst these stories that are always engaging and wide ranging in their themes. Read more of this post

March 2015 Critique/Review/Thoughts


At our monthly pie and a pint meeting, my friend and I discuss — amongst other things — books, creative writing, writing groups, the internet environment, critiquing and quality in writing. A couple of years ago he lent me a book by Robert Rankin, my initial reaction to Rankin was that his books were badly written in that they were grammatically incorrect (in modern grammar usage I’m no longer sure that’s true). On reflection I concluded that I was wrong about Rankin, some people, my friend included, find a quality in his works.

So why should literature be any different from other art forms? Why should literature be bound by any rules, if the style in which someone has chosen to write pleases someone else? My grandchildren can read and write … in common with Chester’s Josie. Their Facebook entries are hardly quality prose … then, perhaps, a clue may be found in Mallory Ortberg’s Texts From Jane Eyre. Of course there are constraints like: ‘Did I enjoy reading it?’ and somewhere in this enjoyment, either consciously or unconsciously, there is an  assessment of quality. That abstract and personal assessment, which always sends me back to Zen and the 17th Chapter.

Read more of this post

February 2015 Critique/Review/Thoughts


Yet another difficult month for making choices, the discussion helped in making me think a lot about how difficult it must be to co-ordinate this group and especially to ‘score’ the contributions. I try to group the entries (romance, drama, etc) but this isn’t easy as such simplification doesn’t necessarily provide the key to what may be the contributor’s intent. Read more of this post

January 2015 Review/Critique


My choice has become one of personal preference, in effect which stories gave me the most reading pleasure. That is not to say that the other stories were not an enjoyable read, but I had to make a choice. One that was not made on the quality and presentation of a story, that would have meant too many choices, and so my list is heavily biased. Read more of this post

OH NO! Not another blog on blogging!


When I first began blogging on My Telegraph there seemed to be a continual cry of, OH NO! Not another blog on blogging!  My search for a ‘decent’ site had led me there and having lurked off stage – so to speak – I decided to blog there, beginning with non-controversial blogs. I thought the site often treated newcomers in a very unfriendly manner, certainly not in any way that could be termed ‘an honest critique’ of their blog content or its presentation.

Some five or more years later, the world has moved on. Amateur bloggers like myself who now know how the professional media have commandeered the internet – if they’re wise – have given up any delusions of grandeur that they may have held, or are captives of that media. Still, blogging does give voice to the ‘common man’ (I’m sure you ladies know my intent) and both the professional media and amateur bloggers are learning to use ‘blogs’ effectively. So! Cue Aaron Copland and Fanfare for the Common Man (article). Read more of this post

HO – HO


A close friend of mine has a grandson diagnosed as an Aspie, having become more enlightened on Aspberger’s Syndrome, I was prompted to post a critique of the TV programme Chasing Shadows.

Whilst researching material for this critique I came across a web site, written by an Angry Autie  who had posted an amusing piece with the title: The Institute for the Study of the Neurologically Typical. Read more of this post

The Boxing Day Hunt


The Boxing Day Hunt – Perfect Entertainment after Christmas Bingeing looked to be an interesting post on a one time favourite rural pastime. Written in 2012, it opening with:

One of the tedious things about being poor is that one can’t indulge in pastimes like hunting. But one can turn up, as a supporter, and soak up the atmosphere (and maybe a bit of the Port). It really is enormous fun. If you haven’t done it, why not try it this year, on Boxing Day? Read more of this post

Nov 2014 CWG Critique


Wishing you all a Merry Christmas hardly seems appropriate after this months dominant response to the theme. Again the allocation of points was really difficult and even with a predominantly common death theme the entries didn’t easily divide into common approaches to this theme. I was driven this month to considering what creative writing actually is and was again surprised at the plethora of information on this subject. It would seem that the notion of creative writing is only limited by the creativity of the originator (Hm! That sounds rather trite). I found this critique on a critique interesting. Read more of this post

The Magic System


ADVERTISING: THE MAGIC SYSTEM¹ – Raymond Williams

In the last hundred years […] advertising has developed from the simple announcements of shopkeepers and the persuasive arts of a few marginal dealers into a major part of capitalist business organization. This is important enough, but the place of advertising in society goes far beyond this commercial context. It is increasingly the source of finance for a whole range of general communication, to the extent that in 1960 our majority television service and almost all our newspapers and periodicals could not exist without it. Further, in the last forty years and now at an increasing rate, it has passed the frontier of the selling of goods and services and has become involved with the teaching of social and personal values; it is also rapidly entering the world of politics. Advertising is also, in a sense, the official art of modern capitalist society: it is what ‘we’ put up in ‘our’ streets and use to fill up to half of ‘our’ newspapers and magazines: and it commands the services of perhaps the largest organized body of writers and artists, with their attendant managers and advisers, in the whole society. Since this is the actual social status of advertising, we shall only understand it with any adequacy if we can develop a kind of total analysis in which the economic, social and cultural facts are visibly related. We may then also find, taking advertising as a major form of modern social communication, that we can understand our society itself in new ways. Read more of this post

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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