Tag Archives: statistics

Protected: The Economics of Luxury Goods


This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Google Ngram


Google provide a programme called the Ngram Viewer, which enables the tracing of words or phrases as they have been used in books over the centuries. At a recent regular meeting with an ex-colleague of mine, we discussed  wealth, prosperity and happiness, in the context of growth and inequality. The problem withe Ngram is the context in which the words are being used, by whom, when and for what purpose. Read more of this post

Aasof on Female Art


This week on Facebook: The voting system used by Ranker suggests that female authors are remembered better than female artists (I wonder how many can name famous female authors prior to the 19th century?).

The word painters is used instead of artist to identify (in this case) female artists from those to whom a much wider genre is generally applied to the word ‘artist‘.

If the following seems an homage to the now ‘famous’ feminist art historian Linda Nochlin who changed the art world with her 1971 essay in which she asked, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists”?¹ Perhaps it can be read as such!

Read more of this post

The rising cryptocurrency


This week on Facebook: My attention was caught yet again by shills offering fantastic returns on a financial investment. It could be harsh perhaps to use the definition of a shill as, an accomplice of a confidence trickster or swindler who poses as a genuine customer to entice or encourage others [SOED]. However, it’s implausible the think that a shill is anything other than, a person who pretends to give an impartial endorsement of something in which they themselves have an interest [SOED]. Of course the term shill, when used in this context and especially in a derogatory sense, is sure to raise a lot of resentment, especially when shills are simply responding to the volatility of an economic cycle that is the inevitable result of a fiscal policy adopted by a public administration. In today’s world the euphemism financial crisis is used to disguise actions taken by the public administration that exacerbate the economic cycle and inevitably fail to provide a stable economy. Read more of this post

Back to the future?


The 2017 General Election resulted in the following statistic to which caught my attention and an article by a blogger who calls himself Archbishop Cranmer giving it some rational (perhaps there is some significance in choosing the name of a Tudor protestant martyr).  Cranmer’s article on the outcome of the general election votes for Labour provides a right wing take on the statistic crediting Corbyn’s achievement. However, it is a misleading statistic in the sense that while it shows a significant increase in Labour’s vote share at the 2017 general election, as in 2015 the vote swing to Labour over the Conservatives was not enough to win them the election. In the days of a two party state in British politics, Corbyn’s increased vote share would have translated into the election victories achieved by Attlee in 1945 and Blair in 1997. So why didn’t it? Read more of this post

Cassandra & Growth


This week on Facebook: Am I a rabid follower of Malthus obsessed with an ever growing global population and a believer in Bartlett concerned about the consequences of ignoring the mathematical exponential function? I would like to think not, but I do suggest that a correlation between Malthus and Bartlett could be found the horse manure problem of the late nineteenth century driven by needs and wants of growing economies. Read more of this post

Down on the farm


This week on Facebook: I have posted some articles on factory farming, also known as intensive farming as it applies to the maintenance of livestock, a really difficult subject area that is compounded by global economics. The availability of meat in developed economies has hidden the real cost of its production both in terms of animal husbandry and environmental pollution. A world with the seemingly inexorable growth in the global population and its desire for affordable food, especially meat, would seem to be leading towards not only an environmental catastrophe but an increasing lack of human compassion. Read more of this post

Salving the Conscience?


This week on Facebook I admit to having been duped by a charity. In a fanfare of publicity the charity named The Kids Company, a Ms Camila Batmanghelidjh and, as it turned out, my own government — although there’s nothing new in that — squandered money on anything but charity. It never was The Kid’s Company and it was only the exposé of this charity that focused my attention on the work of charities in the UK. Read more of this post

A life of π


This week on Facebook a week of posts on the subject of pi (π) can surely only be of interest to a geek but don’t worry, there won’t be another week from me like this one until 2022. This week, beginning on Monday March 14, is known as world Pi (π) Day, which this year is 3.1416 (for those that use a non UK English notation).

Though as Michael Caine is wrongly attributed as saying, ‘Now there’s not many people know that’. I doubt that come tomorrow, the world would have been shaken by the riotous behaviour of those celebrating the advent of the day. Nevertheless, Monday’s annual event did result in the following π pertinent postings. (Incidentally — if the value of π is infinite: How can it be a constant?)

For those who, unlike me (apart from those befuddled moments brought on by old age) who are not geeky, there is always PI (π) Media.  I’m sure that you’re wondering why the name PI (π) Media was chosen.  Never short of an opinion about anything, I would hazard a guess that like the never ending π it’s intended to be a never ending source of online information. It may be of course that once a year it gets free publicity from us millions trawling the net annually in our never ending search for enlightenment regarding the never ending π. Read more of this post

The Budget Deficit – The Record


The role that economic theory plays in the creation of money — even if understood by a government —  is ignored in favour of economic manipulation for the purpose of a fiscal policy. Self interested post war governments have little interest in the social responsibility that Peter Drucker applied to a private enterprise.

“The first responsibility of business is to make enough profit to cover the costs for the future. If this social responsibility is not met, no other social responsibility can be met.”

Peter F. Drucker, The Practice of Management (1954)

Read more of this post

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

%d bloggers like this: