Tag Archives: statistics

Public Debt


This week on Facebook: As I posted in Cassandra on debt and as I had previously conclude in my 2013 post Crisis and Credit, the issue of public debt is used as an excuse for a fiscal policy of austerity measures, yet it is private debt that is behind the fiscal crisis. The State (particularly in the UK) does more to encourage private debt than to control it. Conversely the State continues with its fiscal policy of increasing public debt¹, something that I wrote about in Debt, the prolific mother (2012). Read more of this post

What is GDP?


This week on Facebook: I have remarked in my posts rather a lot on Global Inequality, that while there is a lot of media coverage given over to global inequality there is little indication that it has prompted any mass national desire for global equality. The populations of developed nations may well be aware of just how much they share with the other populations in the developed and developing word (at least in terms of a notional national wealth). My post on Global Inequality asks the question, “Just how equal do we want the world to be?”  The answers would suggest that the wrong question is being asked and that — perhaps — those with a large measure of a quality of life should be asked, “What are they prepared to give up?”. Read more of this post

The rich will always be with us!


This week on Facebook: My 2009 and 2013 posts both had the title ‘The rich will always be us’, and while this post does not link directly to the High Net Worth Individuals (HNWI) in the Capegemini Wealth Reports¹ it certainly alludes to them. A Deloitte report on those who spend their discretionary income on luxury items² and one from an Oxford Research Encyclopaedia on the luxury business³, are used in this post sharing the title  “The rich will always be with us’. Having written a number of posts on Brazil I have received criticism from my colleagues in the USA regarding Brazil’s uncertain economic growth, especially with the publication of my post on China Brazil a perspective. This time, rather than take what is a complicated global perspective, I have focused on Brazil as a global indicator for the purchase of luxury items.

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The Value of Money


  This week on Facebook: In ‘The Coming Dark Ages?’ I criticised all the articles for failing to point out that (in my view) the prevalence of an economic global hegemony by Western Philosophy relied on a reserve currency in a fiat money world. Money at the centre of globalisation, whether it is trade or war that is the dominant driving force for global economic growth. I was especially critical of the article America enters the dark ages concluding that in my opinion money, war and a rising nationalism, are the most likely harbingers in any coming of a new dark age.
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A Digital Dark Age?


This week on Facebook:  Last week was not referring to the digital dark age but rather to the coming dark age predicted, in my mind,  in a very large part to the philosophies of Thomas Malthus and Professor Albert Bartlett. I wrote about Thomas Malthus in  Malthus and Growth and mentioning both Malthus and Bartlett in Cassandra & Growth, both of which were posted early last year.  Read more of this post

Google Ngram


Google provide a programme called the Ngram Viewer, which enables the tracing of words or phrases as they have been used in books over the centuries. At a recent regular meeting with an ex-colleague of mine, we discussed  wealth, prosperity and happiness, in the context of growth and inequality. The problem withe Ngram is the context in which the words are being used, by whom, when and for what purpose. Read more of this post

Aasof on Female Art


This week on Facebook: The voting system used by Ranker suggests that female authors are remembered better than female artists (I wonder how many can name famous female authors prior to the 19th century?).

The word painters is used instead of artist to identify (in this case) female artists from those to whom a much wider genre is generally applied to the word ‘artist‘.

If the following seems an homage to the now ‘famous’ feminist art historian Linda Nochlin who changed the art world with her 1971 essay in which she asked, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists”?¹ Perhaps it can be read as such!

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The rising cryptocurrency


This week on Facebook: My attention was caught yet again by shills offering fantastic returns on a financial investment. It could be harsh perhaps to use the definition of a shill as, an accomplice of a confidence trickster or swindler who poses as a genuine customer to entice or encourage others [SOED]. However, it’s implausible the think that a shill is anything other than, a person who pretends to give an impartial endorsement of something in which they themselves have an interest [SOED]. Of course the term shill, when used in this context and especially in a derogatory sense, is sure to raise a lot of resentment, especially when shills are simply responding to the volatility of an economic cycle that is the inevitable result of a fiscal policy adopted by a public administration. In today’s world the euphemism financial crisis is used to disguise actions taken by the public administration that exacerbate the economic cycle and inevitably fail to provide a stable economy. Read more of this post

Back to the future?


The 2017 General Election resulted in the following statistic to which caught my attention and an article by a blogger who calls himself Archbishop Cranmer giving it some rational (perhaps there is some significance in choosing the name of a Tudor protestant martyr).  Cranmer’s article on the outcome of the general election votes for Labour provides a right wing take on the statistic crediting Corbyn’s achievement. However, it is a misleading statistic in the sense that while it shows a significant increase in Labour’s vote share at the 2017 general election, as in 2015 the vote swing to Labour over the Conservatives was not enough to win them the election. In the days of a two party state in British politics, Corbyn’s increased vote share would have translated into the election victories achieved by Attlee in 1945 and Blair in 1997. So why didn’t it? Read more of this post

Cassandra & Growth


This week on Facebook: Am I a rabid follower of Malthus obsessed with an ever growing global population and a believer in Bartlett concerned about the consequences of ignoring the mathematical exponential function? I would like to think not, but I do suggest that a correlation between Malthus and Bartlett could be found the horse manure problem of the late nineteenth century driven by needs and wants of growing economies. Read more of this post

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

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The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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