Tag Archives: Social Welfare

Aasof on the Elites


This week on Facebook: Perhaps the first question raised is, Who are the elites? They have always been a feature of all societies and have always been instrumental in suppressing the will of the people for a universal franchise¹. If Arrow’s impossibility theorem is correct in that it is generally impossible to assess the validity of a common good, then a social elite theory is also valid. But who are these elites² in a secular, urban and industrial modern society?

Although political science borrows heavily from the other social sciences, it is distinguished from them by its focus on power—defined as the ability of one political actor to get another actor to do what it wants—at the international, national, and local levels. Political Science

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Global Government an Epistocracy?


This week on Facebook: When I was at school we were taught that global power was achieved by the alliance of forces that militarily superior States could muster and little has changed militarily since then. While the politics of governance has been changed by universal suffrage it has done little to change this state of military affaires. I hold the view that any existing global governance, in what Lord Mandelson called the post democratic age, does not lead to a global government other than through an epistocracy.  Read more of this post

Aasof on Global Government


Writing The Thunberg Effect prompted next week’s post on Global Government, something that I fear Greta Thunberg and her fanatical supporters would advocate to save the world. Being a fan of sic-fi films, which are mostly dystopian, like Greta Thunberg I hold a pessimistic view on the future of humankind. However, I’m sure that I hold different views on global government than Thunberg.

The reason: Global warming is not about science, but about politics — that is, about expanding the power of elites using the coercive instruments of government to control the lives of people everywhere.  Just as the governing class embraces ineffective Keynesian stimulus spending to justify expansion of government, they now extol AGW as the basis for increasing their power to rule over the rest of us. The Goal Is Power: The Global Warming Conspiracy

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What does inflation mean!


This week on Facebook: I am still being asked, “Who is it that this debt is owed to. The examples of  public debt that I referred to last Sunday appear’s to be of little concern to an electorate who assume that economic growth can continue unabated. The electorate’s assumption appears to be that the distribution of this perceived economic growth will be used to support the State’s spending on a social welfare programme. It ignores the history of their public administration’s attitude to debt and particularly to austerity. It was Germany that adopted the earliest modern social welfare programme under the aegis of Otto von Bismarck in 1889 (3).

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Inflation!


This week on Facebook: Last Sunday I tried to show the inflationary effect of fiat money that was introduced at Bretton Woods in 1971. While I think it was something that I failed to do successfully, I may have indicated how difficult it is to arrive at a figure for inflation that is not subject to government fiscal policy. Read more of this post

Cassandra on the greatest illusion!


¯This week on Facebook: The ascendancy of unconstrained finance has always been a feature of wealth and poverty, exacerbated in 1981 (and since) by the cost of a social welfare programme. With deficit financing used to increase the inevitable shortfall in government budgets and the cost being borne by a fiscal policy that is an increasing burden on the taxpayer already burdened with government financial errors.

The greatest illusion held in the UK and becoming prevalent globally, is that the State will always provide a social welfare programme that mitigates its users from the effects of any austerity.

State prediction of economic growth have not been realised and the general public have, of recent years, mostly been subjected to austerity. This austerity is created by debts encouraged by The City and low incomes encouraged by State fiscal policy.

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Welfare on a Global Scale?


This week on Facebook: The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations (UN) makes reference to social security and the economic, social and cultural rights of ‘the common people’¹. The UN’s writing of economic rights first is to my mind quite deliberate, in that without them any social and cultural rights look set to fall. However, finding a meaningful definition of economic and cultural rights has been difficult and resulted in my resorting to podcasts. While the podcasts have the titles ‘Economic Rights’ and Cultural Rights in the 20th Century, both lead to the question of human rights (4).

The European Union (EU) attaches great importance to the interdependence of all human rights and consider economic, social and cultural rights as part of a social welfare program that may well constrain the development of the EU (5). These issues also constrain the actions of the United Nations (UN) to a degree but are an essential part of any Group of 20 (G20) social welfare programmes, where the ratio of gross domestic product (GDP) to any social welfare programme that a G20 State has affects the forecast of future economic growth.

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The UK Welfare State


This week on Facebook: The UK 2010 State of the nation¹ reported on poverty, worklessness and welfare dependency in the UK that: “Over the past 13 years we have seen more and more money spent on the benefits system in an attempt to move people from below the 60% poverty threshold to above it. Expenditure on child-related benefits alone has almost doubled. Yet despite this expenditure, the figures in this document show that this approach is failing.

Income inequality is at its highest since records began; millions of people are simply parked on benefits with little hope of ever progressing into work; there are 800,000 more working age adults in poverty than in 1998/99; and high levels of family breakdown, educational failure, addiction and health inequality are having a severe impact on outcomes for both adults and children.” [sic] Read more of this post

Public Debt


This week on Facebook: As I posted in Cassandra on debt and as I had previously conclude in my 2013 post Crisis and Credit, the issue of public debt is used as an excuse for a fiscal policy of austerity measures, yet it is private debt that is behind the fiscal crisis. The State (particularly in the UK) does more to encourage private debt than to control it. Conversely the State continues with its fiscal policy of increasing public debt¹, something that I wrote about in Debt, the prolific mother (2012). Read more of this post

What is GDP?


This week on Facebook: I have remarked in my posts rather a lot on Global Inequality, that while there is a lot of media coverage given over to global inequality there is little indication that it has prompted any mass national desire for global equality. The populations of developed nations may well be aware of just how much they share with the other populations in the developed and developing word (at least in terms of a notional national wealth). My post on Global Inequality asks the question, “Just how equal do we want the world to be?”  The answers would suggest that the wrong question is being asked and that — perhaps — those with a large measure of a quality of life should be asked, “What are they prepared to give up?”. Read more of this post

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Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

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