Tag Archives: Social Media

Cassandra on The Future?


This week on Facebook: My original posts on State Surveillance (2016) and that on Cash is subversive (2012) can still be read, however I recommend that you read the Snooper’s Charter (which became law in 2016) and the reference at¹.  You might also read Big Brother Loves You (which was posted in 2012) and the reference at². However, these are assumed liberties in which government policy (globally) to the Covid-19 pandemic has made the economic and environmental future even more uncertain. Read more of this post

Covid-19 Global Lockdown


This week on FaceBook: My wife and I are under lockdown¹, I am not suffering from the blues as in (1) but my wife lives in fear of a taser attack by the police. My sons keep telephoning us to see if we are alright during this lockdown and I guess we should be grateful for that. My younger son persuaded me phone up the NHS as I think that I have the mild form of Covid-19. The NHS help line, as far as I can make out, is overwhelmed by people who think that they might have the coronavirus. My son telephoned to check up on me, telling me that people lied about their symptoms, resulting in them being taken to hospital by ambulance and to be tested for a Covid-19 that they didn’t have.

Would a lockdown have been effective during the black death, it would probably have not been so, however we will never know as people were unaware of the causes of the black death. People were equally unaware when the Derbyshire village of Eyam went into lockdown during the 17th century, it is claimed that doing so saved many lives outside of the village, at great cost to those remaining. Covid-19 may require a political response, but the enemy is a pandemic with flu-like symptoms carried by a virus as at Eyam.

Today the story is different, which lead me to two articles that I read recently, the first was The microbes, the animals and us and the second Microbes in Motion: Touring World History, both viewpoints leading to problems that a vaccine cannot cure. Nevertheless, as is remarked on an Australian site, while Covid-19 calls for solidarity it also begets deeper conflicts and while history may repeat itself, globally the development of a vaccine to save us takes precedence over any other conflict:

 But more importantly, the basic distributive conflicts that characterise politics will rise to the surface. Unless a vaccine saves us, quickly. Let us hope so. The politics of the pandemic

Read more of this post

UK — Electoral Naiveté


This week on Facebook: UK electoral issues¹. Every election does — to my mind —point to the fundamental differences between how they are viewed by politicians, the electorate, and the social media. Each may have what they consider to be pragmatic views but they only agree on their own self interest and not on that of the State. This includes the social media (news on the web) which, for the most part, are articles written for publication and intended to appeal to a certain readership. While we all are guilty of doing that, some of us may claim to have learned our lesson.

Read more of this post

Aasof on the problem with TED!


This week on Facebook: In compiling this post it occurred to me that online information has made us all instant experts on any topic, non more so that those who go to TED talks or use TEDx from YouTube. TED’s slogan shouldn’t be ‘Ideas worth spreading’, it should be: ‘Ego worth paying for’, or as Sunday’s post suggest, instead of the mnemonic  ‘Technology, Entertainment, Design’, TED should renamed to the mnemonic to MMI: Middlebrow Megachurch Infotainment. Ultimately, the TED phenomenon only makes sense when you realise that it’s all about the audience. TED Talks are designed to make people feel good about themselves; to flatter them and make them feel clever and knowledgeable; to give them the impression that they are part of an elite group making the world a better place. Read more of this post

Aasof on the death of social media!


This week on Facebook: I was quite surprised at the time that I have given over to posts on the social-media. In 2016 I wrote in A Hall of Mirrors that those advocates of digital freedom claimed to have clear missions about their defence of free speech or freedom of expression, any ethos of intent in their mission would seem to be lost in the public’s use of social-media. Read more of this post

Aasof on you and social-media


This week on Facebook: I am quite busy at the moment but as I intend to continue with the social-media next week, I thought the following video may interest some of you! Read more of this post

Aasof on Fat Cats


This week on Facebook: The collapse of the company Thomas Cook raised the spectre of fat-cats¹. Government folly in its fiscal policy matters has always served the interests of the Fat Cats and which, despite any disingenuous political protests², results in yet another burden on the taxpayer. The collapse of Thomas Cook led to its staff, based in the UK, losing their jobs with the troubled operator. Read more of this post

Poetry & other ‘things’!


This week on Facebook: Not that I am short of things to write about but sometimes even I get bored with myself and my tendency to rabbit on and on Still, when I meet my ex-colleague for our monthly ‘pie and a pint’ we often discuss how little things have actually changed. Then we are both getting old and hold the geriatric view that the world is going to hell in a handcart.

Of course materially things have changed quite dramatically, particularly post WWII and especially for the following generations. Although I’m not sure that today Aaron Copland could call his piece Fanfare for the Common Man without raising a controversy. I’m sure that any such controversy would get a mention in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, unlike Copland’s sexuality. It seems that todays society has a predilection for declaring and writing about sexual orientation something that has yet to occur, at least in our conversation over a ‘pie and a pint’. But then it may all be part of a geriatric view that the world really is going to hell in a handcart.

Not so the epigram plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose, which is probably familiar to most of my generation. However, some of my family may read my reflections so for their benefit I will add that it was a somewhat cynical remark by Alphonse Karr translated as, “The more things change, the more they stay the same”. 

Read more of this post

But what is Money?


This week on Facebook: I have posted a lot on the subject of money, often referring to Investopedia, the International Monetary Fund, European Central Bank (which is not a ‘central‘ bank at all) and the Encyclopaedia Britannica¹.

  • Investopedia: Everyone uses money.
  • IMF: Money may make the world go around, as the song says.
  • ECB: The nature of money has evolved over time.

Holding the views I do about money and especially ‘the double coincidence of wants‘ problem, I now find myself torn between the notions of commodity money and fiat money. Of course whether or not either money has value ultimately comes back to the double coincidence of wants, this time being set by the Foreign Exchange Market².

The value of a country’s currency depends on whether it is a “free float” or “fixed float”. Free floating currencies are those whose relative value is determined by free market forces, such as supply / demand relationships. A fixed float is where a country’s governing body sets its currency’s relative value to other currencies, often by pegging it to some standard. Free floating currencies include the U.S. Dollar, Japanese Yen and British Pound, while examples of fixed floating currencies include the Chinese Yuan and the Indian Rupee. Foreign Exchange Market

The reasons for a State investing in another State’s money may be quite complex, which raises the question of if China’s wealth is in the free floating USA dollars debt that it owns, or the fixed floating currency of the Yuan. Read more of this post

Screwtape revisited


This week on Facebook: Any human thoughts on Theism present many different conclusions, as do human thoughts on the subject of Atheism and you must draw your own conclusions. To a certain extent the Inklings shared religious views¹, particularly on Christianity. Views that were certainly more prevalent than they are today, I mention this because their shared religious views was probably the glue that held the Inklings together, that and the friendship between C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien)². Read more of this post

Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

Ed Conway

Blogs and charts and stuff

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

Ed Conway

Blogs and charts and stuff

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

%d bloggers like this: