Tag Archives: research

On Visiting Myopia


This week on Facebook: I thought the quote that Freedom meant freedom from material want  too difficult to answer although I did try, but notions of freedom and material wants come with such a variance that any general answer would be virtually impossible and any specific answer dependant on how the quote was interpreted. This became apparent from an interesting exchange that developed between Colin and Scott in response to my published article on Monday. Read more of this post

AGI & CEV


This week on Facebook: I intended to take a break from my theme of robots and AI but on reflection thought that perhaps a week of utopian articles should be set against the largely dystopian ones vis-à-vis AI, robotics and humans that I had previously published. I was surprised to find that utopian articles on the relationship between AI and humans were quite difficult to find. Those utopian articles that I did find could — to my mind — be classified as Pollyannaish. Read more of this post

AI & Humans


This week on Facebook: I was expecting to move on from AI, or at least ignore it for a while, then I read about Elon Musk and Neuralink — a venture to merge the human brain with AI. This led to yet more thoughts on robotics and AI, which will become a never ending story in what remains of my lifetime.  Perhaps I may be spared the realisation of what the Financial Times calls the Frankenstein fears hanging over AI, which can be read by clicking on the following image: Read more of this post

Free Trade?


This week on Facebook: Were I a conspiracy theorist I could be drawn to the notion that  Free Trade agreements are a means of ensuring hegemony over a democratic electorate and expanding the global authority of totalitarian regimes. Increasingly these agreements intend to penalise nation states where productivity, or lack of it, are not subsidised by the visible hand of a state’s public administration. Read more of this post

Cassandra & Growth


This week on Facebook: Am I a rabid follower of Malthus obsessed with an ever growing global population and a believer in Bartlett concerned about the consequences of ignoring the mathematical exponential function? I would like to think not, but I do suggest that a correlation between Malthus and Bartlett could be found the horse manure problem of the late nineteenth century driven by needs and wants of growing economies. Read more of this post

Foundations of Virtue?


This week on Facebook: There has been a lot of media furore over Donald Trump’s election as the 45th President of the USA and I could post five articles in a similar vein to those below about ‘The Trump Foundation’. What is clear to me is that a number of these political foundations are used to fund an ongoing quasi-political lifestyle for the foundation members and more importantly can be seen as sellers of political influence for donations. The fact that foreign governments — as in Australia (Friday’s article) — use their taxpayers monies to buy such influence should cause a national outrage. National administrations, which notionally term themselves democratic, are only able to behave in this kleptocratic manner when their electorate is largely indifferent. If the reported fall in donations to the Clinton Foundation are not an indication of how a foundation operates a pay to play policy, what is? Read more of this post

In vino veritas!


This week on Facebook: I thought that with Christmas approaching, a week of the viniferous might be appropriate be you a vinologist or simply vinose and without a tendency to vinolence. Did you know that there are actually wine days celebrated throughout the year? I don’t know them all but I’m sure that I don’t miss any. Read more of this post

Teach a man to fish!


This week on Facebook: My attention turned to fish and the ever increasing global demand for sources of protein. I often mention in conversations with a friend what I call my Tesco Tuna Test, the contention being that cheap tins of Tuna — usually sold as 3 tins wrapped together — is only possible when the supply continues to exceed (or match) the demand. The demand is clearly going to increase, along with the price and the eventual reduction in the global supply of supply of tuna. If the TTT provides a measure of global overfishing by the price of wrapped tins of tuna divided by the weight of tuna therein, it will also increase. It’s difficult to predict what number in the TTT would represent global overfishing, especially as that number has already been reached, but perhaps it may represent the rate at which global overfishing is occurring. This assumes that supermarkets, their suppliers and consumers of tuna, actually care as the TTT has yet to begin a recognisable (and inevitable) exponential rise. Read more of this post

Down on the farm


This week on Facebook: I have posted some articles on factory farming, also known as intensive farming as it applies to the maintenance of livestock, a really difficult subject area that is compounded by global economics. The availability of meat in developed economies has hidden the real cost of its production both in terms of animal husbandry and environmental pollution. A world with the seemingly inexorable growth in the global population and its desire for affordable food, especially meat, would seem to be leading towards not only an environmental catastrophe but an increasing lack of human compassion. Read more of this post

Fleeced Again!


This week on Facebook: Being somewhat surprised by the scale of the political incompetence (although political connivance would fit equally well) that I came across in last week’s article on pensions, I decided that this week I would look a little deeper. I found that the sorry saga continues with perhaps the only positive slant that could be put on it would be that of politicians caring for their own stipends.  Read more of this post

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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