Tag Archives: research

Inequality & Economic Growth


This week on Facebook: While listening to a lecture by John Maynard Keynes the famed economist, Peter Drucker realised that Keynes and all the brilliant economics students in the room were interested in the behaviour of commodities while he was interested in the behaviour of people. An epiphany that would eventually lead to his career as a management consultant. Nevertheless, both sought an approach to economic growth that addressed income inequality without advocating that income be distributed equally. Read more of this post

Morituri te Salutant


All Fool’s Day seems an appropriate time to post a short piece about; Morituri te Salutant, Jean-Léon Gérôme, John Donne, Christina Rossetti, Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, Winnie the Pooh, an allusion to H. Rider Haggard (well, more Horace Rumpole really): leading to the ‘Money Advice Service’ on UK funeral costs. Read more of this post

Wealth & Prosperity


This week on Facebook: Is prosperity and wealth the same thing I asked myself a year ago and concluded that it depended on how you defined each word and who that definition applied to:

Oxfam thinks that $8-coffee-drinking millennials with student debt are amongst the world’s neediest and they are if you define wealth without taking into account its context. A millennial who can indulge in an $8 cup of coffee may not be wealthy but is certainly prosperous. The Scramble for Growth! (Aasof’s Reflections)

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Google Ngram


Google provide a programme called the Ngram Viewer, which enables the tracing of words or phrases as they have been used in books over the centuries. At a recent regular meeting with an ex-colleague of mine, we discussed  wealth, prosperity and happiness, in the context of growth and inequality. The problem withe Ngram is the context in which the words are being used, by whom, when and for what purpose. Read more of this post

Aasof on Female Art


This week on Facebook: The voting system used by Ranker suggests that female authors are remembered better than female artists (I wonder how many can name famous female authors prior to the 19th century?).

The word painters is used instead of artist to identify (in this case) female artists from those to whom a much wider genre is generally applied to the word ‘artist‘.

If the following seems an homage to the now ‘famous’ feminist art historian Linda Nochlin who changed the art world with her 1971 essay in which she asked, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists”?¹ Perhaps it can be read as such!

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Aasof on Reading


This week on Facebook: The article that it is claimed everyone has been talking about doesn’t include me, I only came across ‘What the Internet is doing to our brains’ when I began researching what and why we read. Last week I posted a link to an audio recording of the novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo, this was quite interesting as in the English version on Librivox, each chapter of the novel was (for the most part) read by different contributor. Read more of this post

Final thoughts on Les Misérables


Today on Facebook: For someone who wrote with an element of disdain about Les Misérables last week, it may be that I should have finished with the book and the latest film offering on that note. However, my research into Les Misérables led me to an old version of Slate’s Culture Brow Beat where I found an article that questioned the length of Hugo’s novel. Not wanting to distract from last weeks post, and wondering how to use the article, I placed it here¹. Read more of this post

Aasof on “Les Mis”


This week on Facebook:  Or should I say, “Everything you always wanted to know about ‘Les Mis’ but were afraid to ask”.  I like musicals but have been put off ‘Les Mis’ by colleagues who cannot fail to talk about it in anything but rapturous, perhaps even reverential tones. Whether they are waxing lyrically about a stage production, the film, a DVD or simply a CD of the music from it, their adoration of ‘Les Mis’ has driven me further and further from any desire to watch or listen to the music from ‘Les Mis’. I don’t know what conclusions I would draw were to see the show in any form.

Les Misérables by Victor Hugo has had many adaptations over time, but perhaps non that have induced the fervour of the musical adaptation than what has become known as ‘Les Mis’.

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Self Interest, Economics & Altruism


This week on Facebook: I quite deliberately used the term self interest in my posts and assumed that its intention would be understood. However, having decided to research the subject of self interest on the internet it turned out to be a really hard undertaking, not because there was so little information rather there was so much and it was mostly academic. My self interest was to find articles that someone (other than myself) might read and this proved very difficult. Academically there are many facets to the subject of self interest and I was looking for a common understanding. I am left thinking that you must infer what I meant each time I used the term self interest. Read more of this post

The Lammy Review


This week on Facebook: The Lammy Review¹ — An independent review into the treatment of, and outcomes for, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) Individuals in the Criminal Justice System — caught my attention this week. Eventually I realised that there were (at least) two ways of interpreting it, primarily, either it was ‘Review’ that could be ignored unless it lead to a further ‘Report’ requiring political action, or it was a ‘Review’ the outcome of which was the ‘Report’ set by the review’s terms of reference. Calling the ‘Report’ a ‘Review’ was not helped by my inability to find a definition by the UK government that differentiated between the two, my cynicism leading me to conclude that describing it as ‘an independent review’ is civil service Mandarin for ‘file and forget’. Read more of this post

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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