Tag Archives: research

A Reprise for Sunday


This Sunday on Facebook: I offer a reprise from July 2018 as a link to next week posts in which there is a repeat of 2 songs. Those who may be fans of The Great American  Songbook like me (greatly influenced by my mother), may enjoy this Sunday’s reprise. I assure you that although next week’s offering also includes 5 (posted) videos, they are different, as is the theme of my post.

The following are extracts taken from my July 2018 of Aasof on The Great American Songbook and are about my 2 repeats next week, although both are by different artists and intended to add to my question next week: Are Lyricists Poets?

Unlike the instrumental piece composed by Lionel Hampton and Sonny Burke in 1947 with lyrics added in 1954 by Johnny Mercer. Midnight Sun became famous as a jazz standard and is certainly (currently) one of my favourites.

Begin The Beguine was written by Cole Porter for the Broadway show Jubilee  in 1935. Begin The Beguine has a set of lyrics that are hard to remember and a melody that is difficult to forget (at least the opening bars). It’s interesting that it was Artie Shaw’s instrumental version that was a big hit in 1938.

Cassandra on Climate Change


This week on Facebook: I think that action on climate change (which I have been writing about) is a euphemism that enables people to write about the effects of Mathusianism, particularly when comparing economic growth and climate change. Not only is Malthusianism influencing world populations, it is increasingingly being used as a political weapon. A Malthusian catastrophe (in this case) precipitated by an Anthropocene Epoch which not even Thomas Malthus foresaw — a Malthusian world tied together more by individual  concerns over economic growth of their State, rather than the ideology of climate change. Read more of this post

Cassandra and the Climate Apocalypse


 

This Sunday on Facebook:  I had already decide to post ‘Cassandra on Climate Change’ as the theme for next week and was looking for s short piece to introduce it. In doing so I read a piece with the title ‘Cassandra and the Climate Apocalypse’ and decided to repost it — in full — here. Read more of this post

Challenging Climate Change


This week on Facebook: It’s relatively easy to do research into environmental matter on line, I am a bit surprised how difficult it is to thoroughly research any view that may be contrary to the seemingly perceived consensus the climate change/global warming (call it what you will). However, perhaps a former president of Greenpeace¹ provides some explanation to this dichotomy. Read more of this post

New Scientist — Climate Change


This week on Facebook:  Many years ago I remember reading about a group of scientists (or perhaps not yet scientists), who affirmed the (known to them) expected results of a scientific experiment. The information (affirmation) was a false lead and the experiment was meant to find out how much scientists are biased by ‘expected results’. That scientists can be biased was a revelation to me (at the time), perhaps contributing towards my innate cynicism regarding scientific results¹.

10 Correlations That Are Not Causations: How Stuff Works 

Read more of this post

Aasof on Pollination


The entrance to a shop had a man with a stand presenting some environmental issue, to whom I curtly said that I wasn’t interested. However, having loaded the car on taking the trolly back I felt somewhat remiss in my attitude to people who tried to do a job in difficult circumstances. On my return to the shop I asked him if he was collected money. It appears that no-one collects money anymore, everyone wants you to subscribe to something (just like the ads on television). Read more of this post

Anthropocene?


This week on Facebook: The argument, particularly in the USA, appears to revolve around global warming and the cause of it. A long time ago I met someone who had attended the  (original) Rio Conference¹. He remarked that even at the conference the scientist were not in agreement as to the causes of environmental pollution however, those with a political axe to grind clearly there. Well, so much for that! Read more of this post

Meritocracy in China & Authoritarian Democracy


This week on Facebook: I decided to publish a previous post of mine (at least in part), the original has been changed and can be read here. The reason for this reprise being my wish to include the new references at ¹⁄²⁄³ in the post. I’ve also changed an article to one that doesn’t require a subscription or any ‘extra’ reading and made changes to the text, making it compatible with my current posts.

Perhaps the question to ask ourselves is, “Whether or not there is an alternative?”

Read more of this post

On Visiting Myopia


This week on Facebook: I add this as part of my 2019 April posts on political and economic themes, in which there are two reprises that are not quite the same as the originals. However, in this post, both the article on Friday and Ian Buckley’s essay Learning from Adam Smith quote the following caution from economic historian John Kenneth Galbraith.

Corporate executives and their spokesmen who cite Smith today as the source of all sanction and truth without the inconvenience of having read him would be astonished and depressed to know he would not have allowed their companies to exist.

My first reprise has minor alterations and  he original can be read here, what follows is essentially as it was written. Read more of this post

A Peace of the EU — then there’s France!


 This week on Facebook: Perfidious Albion¹ was a phrase much used by Napoléon Bonaparte, who would know the epithet as La Perfide Albion. There has been an enmity between Britain and France at least since the loss of the Angevin Empire by the English (or should that be the Norman invaders) and the 100 years war. It may even be the English insistence on calling themselves Anglo-Saxons, a term used by the French in a pejorative way.

I am sure that the French teach their history as proof of perfidious Albion, with the Fashoda Incident added for good measure. The Fashoda Incident was not taught when I was at school. If it was a mentioned at all would have been overshadowed by General Gordon and Churchill (that hero of the English right and enemy of the British left) participating in the last cavalry charge at the Battle of Omdurman.

The English view of the French is hardly helped by those other Anglo-Saxons during World War I saying, “Lafayette, nous voilà“. Those other Anglo-Saxons who consistently fail to acknowledge the French contribution to the American Revolution. Something the British (or should that be English) also choose to deliberately ignore, even when teaching Cornwallis’s surrender at Yorktown.

Perhaps, joyously received by the French and resentfully by the British (including the English), was General de Gaulle’s now famous “Non to the British application to join the EU. De Gaulle was probably right about one thing (see cartoon below) and that was the English thwarting of European dominance by France — except Charlemagne who may (contrary to popular belief) not have spoken french. The English at this time were real Anglo-Saxons and had their own problems which, had he chose to, Charlemagne could have probably resolved. There are many claims that de Gaulle was the prophet of Brexit ensuring the recognition of the Anglo-Saxon intentions to the EU and the perfidy of Albion was understood by all.

Read more of this post

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

%d bloggers like this: