Tag Archives: politics

The New Slick Road


This week on Facebook: I used to blog a lot on a now defunct site called My Telegraph, as did a chap who I think called himself Atrium. Eventually Atrium disappeared in a fit of pique, I think it was because he had such little response to his many cri de coeur regarding his opinions. Observing Atrium was a salutary lesson that taught me a lot about blogging and I think I understand why he left My Telegraph in such a huff. It was (at least in a large part) an ‘age’ thing, Atrium was most probably in my peer group, retired and clearly with a lot of time to spend on the social media. He had forgotten that as a younger man, when in a job and less time on his hands, any talk of putting the world to rights was invariably euphemistic and tempered by a blind faith that the democracy of our public administration lay in hands of the electorate.

My piquancy (I would hope) is not only tempered by an ever increasing understanding of the social media but also by the limitations to my curmudgeonliness. However, a recent article in MoneyWeek with the title ‘A Credit Score That Judges Your Politics’ (see Monday’s article) caused me to have an Atrium moment, a cri de coeur if you will.  Imagine a world where many of your daily activities were constantly monitored and evaluated: what you buy at the shops and online; where you are at any given time; who your friends are and how you interact with them; how many hours you spend watching content or playing video games; and what bills and taxes you pay—or not (see Tuesday’s article). Think of the world that you are already living in!

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Inequality & Technology


This week on Facebook: The subject of global inequality is clearly one that presents a global dilemma in the search for a rational between the inequalities that economic growth has introduced with the advances in technology¹. The latter being this week’s subject as the harbinger of global inequality that is now being experienced by the developed worldWould that it were that simple, but many more factors are involved and while a scapegoat for global economic woes may be desirable, its use is only papering over the cracks that are now being revealed.

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Inequality & Economic Growth


This week on Facebook: While listening to a lecture by John Maynard Keynes the famed economist, Peter Drucker realised that Keynes and all the brilliant economics students in the room were interested in the behaviour of commodities while he was interested in the behaviour of people. An epiphany that would eventually lead to his career as a management consultant. Nevertheless, both sought an approach to economic growth that addressed income inequality without advocating that income be distributed equally. Read more of this post

Wealth & Prosperity


This week on Facebook: Is prosperity and wealth the same thing I asked myself a year ago and concluded that it depended on how you defined each word and who that definition applied to:

Oxfam thinks that $8-coffee-drinking millennials with student debt are amongst the world’s neediest and they are if you define wealth without taking into account its context. A millennial who can indulge in an $8 cup of coffee may not be wealthy but is certainly prosperous. The Scramble for Growth! (Aasof’s Reflections)

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Global Inequality


This week on Facebook: In September 2016 I posted Inequality & Gini Lorenz, perhaps it was this post that led to an acquaintance finding himself embroiled in discussions about (essentially) wealth distribution. This eventually led to my publishing A Quality of Life in July 2017.

Last week my post on Henry George & Global Inequality, convinced me that global equality, or even a national equality, is not a goal that voters in democratic elections strive for. While there is a lot of media coverage given over to global inequality there is little indication that it has prompted any mass national desire for equality. Read more of this post

Henry George & Global Inequality


This week on Facebook: Has been given over mostly to Henry George, in his heyday Henry George was very popular, with his ideas inspiring passionate debate among young intellectuals. After George published Progress and Poverty in 1879, a political movement grew in the United States around his work. The notion that Henry George promoted of a Land Value Tax (LVT) has now become a global issue, with the Henry George Foundation having offices in many countries. Read more of this post

Aasof on “Les Mis”


This week on Facebook:  Or should I say, “Everything you always wanted to know about ‘Les Mis’ but were afraid to ask”.  I like musicals but have been put off ‘Les Mis’ by colleagues who cannot fail to talk about it in anything but rapturous, perhaps even reverential tones. Whether they are waxing lyrically about a stage production, the film, a DVD or simply a CD of the music from it, their adoration of ‘Les Mis’ has driven me further and further from any desire to watch or listen to the music from ‘Les Mis’. I don’t know what conclusions I would draw were to see the show in any form.

Les Misérables by Victor Hugo has had many adaptations over time, but perhaps non that have induced the fervour of the musical adaptation than what has become known as ‘Les Mis’.

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European United States


This week on Facebook:  I decided to post the articles from a special series by National Public Radio (npr) with the title of: Midlife Crisis — State Of The European Union (presented in an audio format and an included transcript).

We will have these great United States of Europe, that are the crown of the old world just as the United States of America are the crown of the new one. We will have … a country without frontiers, a budget without parasitism, a commerce without duties  … youth without barracks … justice without scaffold … truth without dogma. Victor Hugo — Peace Congress, Lugano, 1872

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German Reunification


This week on Facebook: Mainly for the benefit of my children, I should like to point out that German reunification refers to that of 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall,which led to Tag der Deutschen Einheit. This is not the same as Bismarck’s German Unification of 1850 to 1871 nor is it the 1938 AnschlussRead more of this post

Victor Hugo, Europe United, “Mais Non”


This week on Facebook: Having began the year on the topic of the EU I was attracted to an article published in Europe’s Journal of Psychology  (EJOP) — Vol 1, No 4 (2005) with the title ‘The French Vision of Europe from Victor Hugo’s United States of Europe to the No to the Constitution’ from which this week’s extracts have been taken. The EJOP contribution by Michel Viegnes offers an insight into the French psyche and the influence that Victor Hugo continues to have on it.

This EJOP article is rather long, which I have made it more readable by breaking down the paragraphs, some editorial arrangements and adding a number of links. However, despite these modifications, the paper is still intended to represent the views as written by the author. Should you wish to read the published article in EJOP, a link to it is also included below. Read more of this post

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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