Tag Archives: police

State Surveillance


This week on Facebook: I decided to conclude my research into aspects of the internet and especially those involving social media by focusing on State surveillance. Initially prompted by what I am sure was intended as an innocuous remark about an age of transparencyeach step that I have taken has led to posts that have drawn me deeper into the morass that is the internet and particularly that associated with social media. My research into surveillance by the State reinforces my dystopian view of the future regarding the changing of democracy in the UK.

It seems to me that the nature of the ultimate revolution with which we are now faced is precisely this: That we are in process of developing a whole series of techniques which will enable the controlling oligarchy who have always existed and presumably will always exist to get people to love their servitude. [Aldous Huxley — 1962 U.C. Berkley]  Read more of this post

Social Media and Terrorism


This week on Facebook: Posts on terrorism and the social media are easy to find given the obsession with jihadism in the global media where it is seen as the most prominent threat to the stability of any State and in particular to those States that espouse democracy. Those that the West call jihadists have a common interest with social media companies in wanting to reach a global audience. Read more of this post

Social Media as a Safe Space


This week on Facebook: It seems that however careful you are in your use of the internet it’s wrong to assume that you are in a safe space. This is particularly true if you interact with the social media and assume it to be the bastion of free expression that democracy allows. The  free expression and the rule of law assumed by you may not be interpreted the same way by others. Read more of this post

Grading The War On Terror


Lincoln, Civil Liberties, and the Constitution proposes a grading system for those Presidents of the United States of America who enacted special ‘internal security measures‘ in a time of war. Mark Neely ‘graded’ four American Presidents, according to an analysis of their administration’s response to the internal security measures they enacted. He asked three simple questions that were all about behaviour and not about the law. Read more of this post

Whom the Gods would destroy


 My posts on matter considered obscene, reminded me of the 1930 case when Sir Ethelred Rutt K.C., had the misfortune of appearing before a full Bench of magistrates on behalf of the headmaster (a clergyman) of Eton College. Certain publications had been found at Eton College by a Police Constable Boot in his zealous discharge of a special warrant, whereupon the headmaster was charged under Lord Campbell’s Act, England’s first obscenity statute. The headmaster admitted that the publications kept on the premises were to be ‘sold, distributed, lent, or otherwise published’ – within the meaning of the Act – to the students under his charge, who were from thirteen to nineteen years of age. Read more of this post

REX v THE HEAD MASTER OF ETON


LORD CAMPBELL’S ACT

AT Windsor to-day, before a full Bench of magistrates, a serious charge was made against the Head Master of Eton, a clergyman, who appeared to feel his position acutely. Police-Constable Boot gave evidence in support of the charge, which was preferred under the – Obscene Publications Act, 1857, commonly known as Lord Campbell’s Act. Read more of this post

Chasing Shadows


Detective Sergeant Sean Stone (DS Stone), is one of the main characters in ITV’s new four part crime drama Chasing Shadows. DS Stone is ‘not normal’, something only implied at the outset when he spoke out of turn at a press conference, arranged by his Chief Superintendent (CS Drayton) to announce the solving of a major crime. In doing so, the plaudits CS Drayton expected to receive from the assembled press reporters became recriminations. This incurred the wrath of the CS Drayton who told Stone that he was ‘finished’ and immediately transferred him to a missing persons charity as their liaison officer. Given the following portrayal of DS Stone’s ‘abnormal behaviour’ in this opening episode, it can hardly have gone unnoticed before, especially by CS Drayton. This created a highly improbable exposition, it being simply a contrivance to introduce the theme of a neurotypical person’s relationship with someone having Asperger’s syndrome. Read more of this post

Anti Terrorist Legislation


On 1st September 2014 the Prime Minister argued that there may need to be an enhancing of the Government’s power to exclude individuals from certain areas whilst re-introducing the ability to move subjects without their consent. He announced a series of new measures to assist with combating terrorist threats, declaring that the Government would “introduce new powers to add” to the current system of Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs). Specifically, that this would involve expanding them to include “enhanced” exclusion zones and a reintroduction of relocation orders. Looking specifically at the ability to exclude individuals from certain areas, it is difficult to see what new powers the Government requires. Read more of this post

The Patriot


Samuel Johnson was not indicting patriotism when he said in 1775: “Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel”. As James Boswell wrote:

‘He (Johnson) was at all times indignant against that false patriotism, that pretended love of freedom, that unruly restlessness, which is inconsistent with the stable authority of any good government’ – Boswell’s Life Of Johnson. Read more of this post

A passport and a prerogative to boot.


There is no entitlement to a passport, they are issued by a Minister’s exercise of the Royal prerogative and exercising this Royal prerogative also means that a passport can be withdrawn. There is no statute law governing the grant or refusal of British passports. A Government Minister exercising the Royal prerogative may assume that Rex non potest peccare (the King can do no wrong), yet controversy surrounding the ministerial use of the Royal prerogative continues unabated. Read more of this post

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Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

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