Tag Archives: New Labour

Back to the future?


The 2017 General Election resulted in the following statistic to which caught my attention and an article by a blogger who calls himself Archbishop Cranmer giving it some rational (perhaps there is some significance in choosing the name of a Tudor protestant martyr).  Cranmer’s article on the outcome of the general election votes for Labour provides a right wing take on the statistic crediting Corbyn’s achievement. However, it is a misleading statistic in the sense that while it shows a significant increase in Labour’s vote share at the 2017 general election, as in 2015 the vote swing to Labour over the Conservatives was not enough to win them the election. In the days of a two party state in British politics, Corbyn’s increased vote share would have translated into the election victories achieved by Attlee in 1945 and Blair in 1997. So why didn’t it? Read more of this post

Plus ça change


This week on Facebook: My five reprises this week reflect the epigram Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. The epigram is probably familiar to most of my generation and needs no translation (Google it), but perhaps some of my family may read my reflections so it was a somewhat cynical remark that translates as, “The more things change, the more they stay the same”. Jean Baptiste Alphonse Karr (1808-1890) wrote this epigram in the January 1849 issue of Les Guêpes (“The Wasps”), the year following the European 1848 Revolutions.  A number of broadsheets¹ at the time extolled or attacked the presidential candidates General Cavaignac and (most of them) Louis-Napoleon, both of whom Karr described as Les Guêpes.

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2015 Election Year


In The debt we’re in (Jan 2011) I referred to a 2009 report by Brooks Newmark MP with the title The Hidden Debt Bombshell. In it Newmark claimed that the true level of government debt was £2,200 billion and not £805 billion as was reported by the Office for National Statistics. It’s interesting that Newmark has not written a similar report in the run-up to this years general election. However I can understand why. Read more of this post

Lessons in Mandarin


Very occasionally as a Civil Servant I was required to provide a technical contribution to Parliamentary Questions (PQs), at a time when PQs really did allow Members of Parliament to hold the Government to account. The only role my contribution had to a PQ was to complement the response being prepared by a Mandarin. Anything that I may have written would have been lost in the revisions they underwent before reaching the likes of a Bernard Woolley or a Sir Humphrey Appelby. I was reminded of this when I revisited an old paper on Civil Service Mandarin. Read more of this post

Debt and Taxation


The role that economic theory plays in the ‘creation of money’ and the role played by all politicians in the manipulation of ‘economic theory’ for the purpose of a fiscal policy, bear little relationship to the social responsibility that Drucker applied to a private enterprise.

“The first responsibility of business is to make enough profit to cover the costs for the future. If this social responsibility is not met, no other social responsibility can be met.”

Peter F. Drucker, The Practice of Management (1954)

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Doctor Faustus I presume!


The mantra of the previous New Labour Government was that it only borrowed money to invest. All borrowing became an investment and while the mantra may not be chanted by the present Government, the borrowing philosophy continues. Most people (I assume) would define an investment as:

An asset or item that is purchased with the hope that it will generate income or appreciate in the future. [Investopedia] Read more of this post

Gold Plated EU Regulations


‘UK laws and the EU – A myth?’ dealt with claims that EU Directives and EU Regulations were now responsible for a large percentage of UK law. Claims that have now become UK lore. Regardless of this, they must have some influence on UK trade and commerce.

Gold-plating is a term used in European Union law to describe the incorrect transposition of a European directive.

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Cassandra’s Curse


I am not an economist or financial advisor,  nor do I claim to write with any ‘personal professional authority’. However, I do write on economics and financial issues gleaned from – and linked to – professional sources. Writings which, perhaps, I should post as Cassandra  – a metaphor for cases of valid alarms that are disbelieved. Read more of this post

Don’t bank on it!


The 1979 Banking Act introduced by the Labour Government, was the first UK Banking Act to put banking regulation on a statutory footing. ‘The words “bank” and “bankrupt” date from the 13th century when it was bankers bankrupting banks. In the 21st century, bankers are still bankrupting banks. But it is no longer just banks. In England and Wales alone, over half a million individuals and nearly 100,000 businesses have found themselves in insolvency since 2007. Internationally, a growing number of sovereign states face a similar fate’. [2011 Andy Haldane – Control rights (and wrongs)] Read more of this post

Crime? It’s a cover-up!


Under the New Labour administration,the Home Office – acting as an arm of the Government – suppressed criminological research that contradicted ministerial policy. Having placed such a premium on evidence based policy, the government failed to live up to that promise and resorted to fixing both the process and publication of Home Office research to meet the political needs of the time. The Home Office remained silent on all those topics that had the potential to reflect poorly on government, hardly making it an institution that represents the British public. In 2008 a Civitas paper contended that Britain’s policing is amongst the worst in the world. To report Britain’s crime at historically low levels, with a falling crime rate, was specious. So here we are five years later with a new administration that continues this sleight of hand policy to disguise a continuing political ineptitude

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The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

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Professor Mark Elliott

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Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

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The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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