Tag Archives: morality

The Deep State & War


This week on Facebook: I returned to the subject of the Deep State, prompted by three posts on The Burning Platform. It’s difficult not to become a conspiracy theorist when reading articles on the internet, to the point at which I no longer know if I am one or not. I know that I tend to focus on those articles that support my particular views, whether or not they lead me to support a conspiratorial view is something that I’m unsure about. I post those articles that I think have at least some truth to them, and the notion of a Deep State is one of them. The problem comes in discerning the truth, which means usually widening a search of the internet, but searching for the truth on the internet is akin to searching for the holy grailRead more of this post

On Visiting Myopia


This week on Facebook: I thought the quote that Freedom meant freedom from material want  too difficult to answer although I did try, but notions of freedom and material wants come with such a variance that any general answer would be virtually impossible and any specific answer dependant on how the quote was interpreted. This became apparent from an interesting exchange that developed between Colin and Scott in response to my published article on Monday. Read more of this post

Zero Hours Contracts


This week on Facebook: At one of my monthly pie and a pint meetings with a friend (who is also ex-colleague), experiences in our own families had made us both aware of the difficulty in finding some form of permanent or at least longer term re-employment. This led to the subject of zero hour contracts and my subsequent research into them. For a couple of retired ex-civil servants who remembered the post WWII boom in full employment, the realities confronting those seeking employment in today’s commercial climate were brought home (quite literally) to both of us.  Read more of this post

In Praise of Forgetting


This week on Facebook: I was going to use an article on David Rieff’s book/essay In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and Its Ironies in my post on forgetfulness but decided against its inclusion. What I did find interesting though were the reviews of Rieff’s short work received (it is clearly an essay rather than a book). There is — to my mind — a significance in the references to historic memories that the authors selectively chose to include in their reviews and in those that they did not mention. Particularly the impact that their education had in fostering historical memory and the contemporary ironies it creates. Read more of this post

AGI & CEV


This week on Facebook: I intended to take a break from my theme of robots and AI but on reflection thought that perhaps a week of utopian articles should be set against the largely dystopian ones vis-à-vis AI, robotics and humans that I had previously published. I was surprised to find that utopian articles on the relationship between AI and humans were quite difficult to find. Those utopian articles that I did find could — to my mind — be classified as Pollyannaish. Read more of this post

The Deep State


This week on Facebook: Is a kind of interlude which, to my mind, is not divorced from my previous posts. The Deep State is a term I am familiar with and a recent article reminded me of it. Regarding the recently elected President of the USA, Bill Bonner wrote in Money Week, There are many moving parts in the Deep State. Trump can try to pit one against another but he needs broad support in Congress. It is said that he has a Republican majority in the House and the Senate ready to do his bidding. This is not true. What he has — is a pack of clever self seeking politicians sharpening their long knives. Read more of this post

Foundations of Virtue?


This week on Facebook: There has been a lot of media furore over Donald Trump’s election as the 45th President of the USA and I could post five articles in a similar vein to those below about ‘The Trump Foundation’. What is clear to me is that a number of these political foundations are used to fund an ongoing quasi-political lifestyle for the foundation members and more importantly can be seen as sellers of political influence for donations. The fact that foreign governments — as in Australia (Friday’s article) — use their taxpayers monies to buy such influence should cause a national outrage. National administrations, which notionally term themselves democratic, are only able to behave in this kleptocratic manner when their electorate is largely indifferent. If the reported fall in donations to the Clinton Foundation are not an indication of how a foundation operates a pay to play policy, what is? Read more of this post

2016 Banned Books Week USA


Sunday on Facebook: It is over two years since I wrote a piece to coincide with Banned Books Week in the USA. Rather than focus on books that are banned — particularly in the USA and the UK — I decided on two examples of books modified to satisfy a modern readership and one book as an allegory for internet censorship, which may pose an even greater threat to personal freedom. Finally making reference to how state censorship grows in proportion to the public’s access to information, the post itself being an indication of why internet freedom to publish material is so important.

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Inequality & Gini Lorenz


This week on Facebook: An acquaintance found himself embroiled in discussions about (essentially) wealth distribution in the developed and developing word. This is an area fraught with statistical analysis — mostly written in support of a particular issue — and usually extremely biased. Read more of this post

Green and Fiscal Ineptitude


This week on Facebook: The media are full of self-righteous indiction about Sir Philip Green and the BHS scandal, particularly when taking some moral high ground on the issue. Successive governments have always use other people’s money to fund their fiscal profligacy be it financiers or taxpayers, while those in government remain financially immune from their own ineptitude. Their financial consequences are avoided by governments, their financial advisors and bankers placing an ever increasing burden on the taxpayer. Governments run budget deficits that can never be large enough to repay the national debt but large enough to cover interest payments on monies borrowed (at least at the moment — countries do default). This borrowing includes the issue of gilts, the government’s legal Ponzi scheme, where future interest is guaranteed by yet another burden on the taxpayer. Read more of this post

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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