Tag Archives: internet

Cassandra on the only game in town?


This week on Facebook: I wrote (at some length) about The Money Tree in 2018, in the post I mentioned Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) and its claim that, with the political climate turning against the acceptance of austerity, it is time to reject the hegemony of neoliberalism. It is claimed that MMT economics never “run’s out of money” the way people or businesses can. The pandemic caused by Covid-19 has made MMT major topic of debate among politicians economists. Read more of this post

Cassandra on The Future?


This week on Facebook: My original posts on State Surveillance (2016) and that on Cash is subversive (2012) can still be read, however I recommend that you read the Snooper’s Charter (which became law in 2016) and the reference at¹.  You might also read Big Brother Loves You (which was posted in 2012) and the reference at². However, these are assumed liberties in which government policy (globally) to the Covid-19 pandemic has made the economic and environmental future even more uncertain. Read more of this post

Covid-19 A Vaccine!


This week on FaceBook: I thought that I was going to leave Covid-19, but a comment made about the development of a vaccine on another site niggled away in my mind. It seems there is a global assumption that science and scientists have the answers to everything — even a vaccine¹ for the Covid-19 pandemic. Indeed, I posted the same thought on sciences and scientists developing a vaccine when the author made the following remarks:

Unless a vaccine saves us, quickly. Let us hope so. The politics of the pandemic

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Covid-19 global consequences


This week on Facebook: Perhaps the worst consequence to the global pandemic introduced by Covid-19, is that  having spent all that inflationary money to combat the pandemic it ends not with a bang but with a whimper. The pandemic has produced, for the most part, common political solutions involving inflationary measures to boost their economies. As I remarked in my post last week (Global Covid-19), there will be a recovery from this pandemic (for some of us) leading to a global scramble for growth. This recovery will lead to the internal economic measures (a euphemism for austerity) and external beggar thy neighbour policies introduced by the pubic administration.

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Who are 'Les Anglo-Saxons'?


This week on Facebook: I wondered why the Francophone world had such a pejorative view of ‘Les Anglo-Saxons’¹, justified in part by the notion that Anglophones have of a ‘special relationship’² with the USA. They may have good reasons to hold such views, now Anglo-Saxon is a term employed by prominent politicians, serious academics, political commentators, and in everyday conversation”³. For example, Jean Claude Juncker  (clearly not only a Francophone but also a Francophile) accused the Anglo-Saxons of hovering like vultures over the euro crisis, waiting to revel in its failure (4).  

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This week on Facebook: I wondered why the Francophone world had such a pejorative view of ‘Les Anglo-Saxons’¹, justified in part by the notion that Anglophones have of a ‘special relationship’² with the USA. They may have good reasons to hold such views, now Anglo-Saxon is a term employed by prominent politicians, serious academics, political commentators, and in everyday conversation”³. For example, Jean Claude Juncker  (clearly not only a Francophone but also a Francophile) accused the Anglo-Saxons of hovering like vultures over the euro crisis, waiting to revel in its failure (4).  

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UK — Electoral Naiveté


This week on Facebook: UK electoral issues¹. Every election does — to my mind —point to the fundamental differences between how they are viewed by politicians, the electorate, and the social media. Each may have what they consider to be pragmatic views but they only agree on their own self interest and not on that of the State. This includes the social media (news on the web) which, for the most part, are articles written for publication and intended to appeal to a certain readership. While we all are guilty of doing that, some of us may claim to have learned our lesson.

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International Law: Does it exist?


This week on Facebook: The notion — and last week’s post — led me the concept of international law and eventually Plato. International Law can be a avery boring subject in which finding articles that interested me (let alone any readers) was very difficult. Occasionally it gets a diplomat gets arrested for something other that avoiding parking fines, but for those who may be interested in international law there are Jstor references cited at ¹·². Read more of this post

USA & China


This week onFacebook: Heralds a new era in the balance of power, it now being a global issue rather than a European one. With the end of  WWII the United States and Russia wielded their economic hegemony in the West. This western world largely ignored the territorial advances of China. The Russian failure at European economic hegemony has now been replaced in the last forty-years by a resurgent China and the economic growth of oriental states. The balance of power that the USA and China¹·² now share is likely to lead to a conflict for economic and military dominance on an unprecedented global scale. Read more of this post

Aasof on the problem with TED!


This week on Facebook: In compiling this post it occurred to me that online information has made us all instant experts on any topic, non more so that those who go to TED talks or use TEDx from YouTube. TED’s slogan shouldn’t be ‘Ideas worth spreading’, it should be: ‘Ego worth paying for’, or as Sunday’s post suggest, instead of the mnemonic  ‘Technology, Entertainment, Design’, TED should renamed to the mnemonic to MMI: Middlebrow Megachurch Infotainment. Ultimately, the TED phenomenon only makes sense when you realise that it’s all about the audience. TED Talks are designed to make people feel good about themselves; to flatter them and make them feel clever and knowledgeable; to give them the impression that they are part of an elite group making the world a better place. Read more of this post

Aasof on the Elites


This week on Facebook: Perhaps the first question raised is, Who are the elites? They have always been a feature of all societies and have always been instrumental in suppressing the will of the people for a universal franchise¹. If Arrow’s impossibility theorem is correct in that it is generally impossible to assess the validity of a common good, then a social elite theory is also valid. But who are these elites² in a secular, urban and industrial modern society?

Although political science borrows heavily from the other social sciences, it is distinguished from them by its focus on power—defined as the ability of one political actor to get another actor to do what it wants—at the international, national, and local levels. Political Science

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Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

Ed Conway

Blogs and charts and stuff

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

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