Tag Archives: internet

Virtual Vicariousness


This week on Facebook: I decided to follow up my theme from last week to write about the virtual reality, and what is often the vicarious reality of time spent online. It is hardly surprising to find that virtual reality had taken on the form political protest, it would appear that the fictional dystopian world so often predicted, continues towards its political reality. It was thought that social media networks would herald the advent of a true democracy instead it has unleashed an anarchy. As more people gain access to social media networks, they add to the many diverse opinions already promoted on them. Read more of this post

An Unsociable Social Media


This week on Facebook: There is some comfort to be had at my being in my dotage, but I am not immune to the way in which the vagaries of life are presented on the internet and its social media, often disrupting my comfort zone. I am irritated by those campaigns described as Alt (alternative) something or other, or those that wish to expunge history and only allow a selectively biased view of it to be presented.

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The Lammy Review


This week on Facebook: The Lammy Review¹ — An independent review into the treatment of, and outcomes for, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) Individuals in the Criminal Justice System — caught my attention this week. Eventually I realised that there were (at least) two ways of interpreting it, primarily, either it was ‘Review’ that could be ignored unless it lead to a further ‘Report’ requiring political action, or it was a ‘Review’ the outcome of which was the ‘Report’ set by the review’s terms of reference. Calling the ‘Report’ a ‘Review’ was not helped by my inability to find a definition by the UK government that differentiated between the two, my cynicism leading me to conclude that describing it as ‘an independent review’ is civil service Mandarin for ‘file and forget’. Read more of this post

No Hiding Place


This week on Facebook: Ignoring the additional online security problems that users of Facebook are confronted with, I decided to focus on the nothing to hide view that is especially prevalent in a government’s attitude to online surveillance and privacy.  Read more of this post

Social Transformation


This week on Facebook: Last week I wrote that Peter Drucker’s thoughts will remain an important part of the debate on the legitimacy and functions of the corporation but as part of a world increasingly different from that in which he developed his ideas. While the developed world may now eschew religion (in any form), it constantly seeks to find some philosophical thoughts to replace it with and those philosophical thoughts of Drucker’s are no exception. Collectively I think that the internet, and in particular the social media, always provides a means of finding or creating a notional truth. Those in a search of a truth to lead their life by, and which concurs with their notions of social responsibility, become zealots in advocating such truth when they find it. I have a very dystopian view of a future, one in which I find myself increasingly cynical regarding the use that Drucker’s views on social change have been put to by the private sector and public administrations. Read more of this post

Drucker & Social Responsibility


This week on Facebook: Last week in It’s only money! I quoted Peter Drucker, for those who may not be familiar with his works, and perhaps the younger millennials in particular, this week is devoted to my take on the man. On his death (aged 95) in 2005 he was described by a Bloomberg Business Week article as The Man Who Invented Management, I much prefer the subheading ‘Why Peter Drucker’s ideas still matter’. Read more of this post

Aasof on Poetry


This week on Facebook: The final selection is an article on the subject of poetry, if not entirely bringing an end to my respite from matters economic and political, at least giving myself a break from them during the August holiday month. The subject of literature is very much influenced by personal tastes, which is reflected in my choice of poems here.

Last week’s post on essays was probably the one area where the subjects of English Literature and English Grammar overlapped when I was at school. Teachers bent on finding a budding essayists or perhaps a poet, expected us all to wax lyrical over all things. Yet, perhaps, the agony of reading terrible essays in English Grammar was nothing compared to the gauche attempts at poetry made in English Literature. I suspect that it was poetry that caused the unwilling writer and the unfortunate reader the most distress. Read more of this post

Aasof on Essays


This week on Facebook: Following last week’s offering on books I have turned to essays this week and finding myself with too many articles my week on Facebook has forced me to make another choice. The week is given over mainly to articles from contemporary female essayists with one male contributor, whose article on Monday — Why the essay still matters — begins this week on Facebook. Essayist Christy Wampole begins the female contributions on Tuesday with — The Essayification of Everything — in what the New York Times classifies as a blog. Wampole writes: It seems that, even in the proliferation of new forms of writing and communication before us, the essay has become a talisman of our times. What is behind our attraction to it? Is it the essay’s therapeutic properties? Because it brings miniature joys to its writer and its reader? Because it is small enough to fit in our pocket, portable like our own experiences?
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Aasof on Books


This week on Facebook: Follows on from the one I posted last week on cartoons and being more than just cartoons, I deciding to put the 35 funniest cartoons about ebooks and digital reading here. The access to books and ebooks¹²³ these days is phenomenal, but I do remember when it wasn’t always so and conditional on access to a good library. With technology offering access to digitised books through websites like Project Gutenberg, The Library of Congress and Project Muse, a new world has been opened. But where to start this post? Perhaps the blacklisting of Winnie the Pooh in China is a good place, especially as the article was really an homage to the bicentennial of Jane Austen’s death. Read more of this post

Aasof on Cartoons


This week on Facebook: This week’s post on cartoons is prompted by Monday’s article on Peanuts Philosophies but if you click on the link Charles Schulz claims that it was humour and not philosophy that led to the creation of his cartoon characters in Peanuts. I hold the view that a cartoonist must also be a philosopher, perhaps even (as one cartoonist claims) an epistemologist. I intended a single post on literature but when, like Topsy, it had grown to include cartoons, books, essays and poetry I decided to spend a week on each of them all. This week is cartoons and includes those that have historically appeared in newspapers or satirical magazines, it also includes a talk on the history of British cartoons and caricature.  Read more of this post

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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