Tag Archives: human-rights

Morituri te Salutant


All Fool’s Day seems an appropriate time to post a short piece about; Morituri te Salutant, Jean-Léon Gérôme, John Donne, Christina Rossetti, Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, Winnie the Pooh, an allusion to H. Rider Haggard (well, more Horace Rumpole really): leading to the ‘Money Advice Service’ on UK funeral costs. Read more of this post

Aasof on Cyborgs


This week on Facebook: Increasingly there is a notion that our cyborg traits are in conflict with those traits that determine our ethics and that of our humanity,  and yet for the centuries, scientists speculated that we could tap into the body’s system to restore lost functions or enhance our powers, like machines. The concept of acupuncture, which began in China at least 2,500 years ago, premised that there are essential patterns of energy flow (Qi) throughout the body. Modern human cybernetic enhancements emulate the stimuli flowing throughout the body by creating pulses of electrical energy.

Perhaps it is always the human creative ability to form images, ideas, and sensations in the mind without any immediate input of the senses, and an innate ability to invent partial or complete personal realms within the mind from sense perceptions of a shared world that has led to our success as a species. Such imaginings are readily recognised in an artistic world, for example; literature, writing, art, poetry, but imagineering is hardly ever given recognition and credit in the technological world. Yet it may well be the artistic world of imagineering that has led to this world of cyborgs.

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Social Media & Democracy


This week on Facebook: The world is rapidly changing and there is  no doubt that social media has a part to play in this change where global technology has made social media an integral part of most peoples lives. However, just because the technology provides access to world events and opinions it doesn’t mean that all social media users are informed. Although homophily¹ may lead to some form of cohesion between social media users there is a danger that is less obvious and more sinister, the ability to subvert social media and threaten democracy itself.

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An Unsociable Social Media


This week on Facebook: There is some comfort to be had at my being in my dotage, but I am not immune to the way in which the vagaries of life are presented on the internet and its social media, often disrupting my comfort zone. I am irritated by those campaigns described as Alt (alternative) something or other, or those that wish to expunge history and only allow a selectively biased view of it to be presented.

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The Lammy Review


This week on Facebook: The Lammy Review¹ — An independent review into the treatment of, and outcomes for, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) Individuals in the Criminal Justice System — caught my attention this week. Eventually I realised that there were (at least) two ways of interpreting it, primarily, either it was ‘Review’ that could be ignored unless it lead to a further ‘Report’ requiring political action, or it was a ‘Review’ the outcome of which was the ‘Report’ set by the review’s terms of reference. Calling the ‘Report’ a ‘Review’ was not helped by my inability to find a definition by the UK government that differentiated between the two, my cynicism leading me to conclude that describing it as ‘an independent review’ is civil service Mandarin for ‘file and forget’. Read more of this post

No Hiding Place


This week on Facebook: Ignoring the additional online security problems that users of Facebook are confronted with, I decided to focus on the nothing to hide view that is especially prevalent in a government’s attitude to online surveillance and privacy.  Read more of this post

Drucker & Social Responsibility


This week on Facebook: Last week in It’s only money! I quoted Peter Drucker, for those who may not be familiar with his works, and perhaps the younger millennials in particular, this week is devoted to my take on the man. On his death (aged 95) in 2005 he was described by a Bloomberg Business Week article as The Man Who Invented Management, I much prefer the subheading ‘Why Peter Drucker’s ideas still matter’. Read more of this post

A Quality of Life


This week on Facebook: I was going to add a comment to Colin’s remark that life without quality of life has no value, instead it made wonder what was meant by a quality of life. The remark was made in response to Charles’ post Do English Courts Really Believe in the Sanctity of Life?   It seems to me that the sanctity of life and the quality of life are both ethical issues in which some may find, or seek, a correlation. However, I found that the sanctity of life focused more on a spiritual connection, which certainly leads to a personal view. A search for a quality of life was more objective but the questions raised could apply to either. Read more of this post

The Deep State


This week on Facebook: Is a kind of interlude which, to my mind, is not divorced from my previous posts. The Deep State is a term I am familiar with and a recent article reminded me of it. Regarding the recently elected President of the USA, Bill Bonner wrote in Money Week, There are many moving parts in the Deep State. Trump can try to pit one against another but he needs broad support in Congress. It is said that he has a Republican majority in the House and the Senate ready to do his bidding. This is not true. What he has — is a pack of clever self seeking politicians sharpening their long knives. Read more of this post

Demerara Sugar


“Dammit!” He whispered, quiet enough for the in-car mobile not to pick it up — or so he thought. “What the hell does Beccy want.”

“Sorry to interrupt your musical interlude Edward but will you pick up some demerara sugar on your way home, I need some for the desert.”

“Light or dark?”

“Light.”

“Will do.”

He abruptly cut her off, annoyed that she had interrupted the performance of Parsifal that he was listening to on Radio Three. Read more of this post

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

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The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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