Tag Archives: government

Cassandra on Climate Change


This week on Facebook: I think that action on climate change (which I have been writing about) is a euphemism that enables people to write about the effects of Mathusianism, particularly when comparing economic growth and climate change. Not only is Malthusianism influencing world populations, it is increasingingly being used as a political weapon. A Malthusian catastrophe (in this case) precipitated by an Anthropocene Epoch which not even Thomas Malthus foresaw — a Malthusian world tied together more by individual  concerns over economic growth of their State, rather than the ideology of climate change. Read more of this post

Challenging Climate Change


This week on Facebook: It’s relatively easy to do research into environmental matter on line, I am a bit surprised how difficult it is to thoroughly research any view that may be contrary to the seemingly perceived consensus the climate change/global warming (call it what you will). However, perhaps a former president of Greenpeace¹ provides some explanation to this dichotomy. Read more of this post

New Scientist — Climate Change


This week on Facebook:  Many years ago I remember reading about a group of scientists (or perhaps not yet scientists), who affirmed the (known to them) expected results of a scientific experiment. The information (affirmation) was a false lead and the experiment was meant to find out how much scientists are biased by ‘expected results’. That scientists can be biased was a revelation to me (at the time), perhaps contributing towards my innate cynicism regarding scientific results¹.

10 Correlations That Are Not Causations: How Stuff Works 

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Aasof on Pollination


The entrance to a shop had a man with a stand presenting some environmental issue, to whom I curtly said that I wasn’t interested. However, having loaded the car on taking the trolly back I felt somewhat remiss in my attitude to people who tried to do a job in difficult circumstances. On my return to the shop I asked him if he was collected money. It appears that no-one collects money anymore, everyone wants you to subscribe to something (just like the ads on television). Read more of this post

Anthropocene?


This week on Facebook: The argument, particularly in the USA, appears to revolve around global warming and the cause of it. A long time ago I met someone who had attended the  (original) Rio Conference¹. He remarked that even at the conference the scientist were not in agreement as to the causes of environmental pollution however, those with a political axe to grind clearly there. Well, so much for that! Read more of this post

A Golden Shield and A Great Cannon


This week on Facebook: In researching ‘internet censorship’ the question of ‘control‘ is a word frequently used but I’m not convinced that it is correct. Control of the internet is simply the means to an end and it is the regulations a State applies to internet use that determines its use. In other words State control, through regulations backed by the law that the State applies as ‘rules’ to its use¹. Read more of this post

A Strong & Stable Leadership?


This week on Facebook: When the Fixed-term Parliaments Act (FTPA) was introduced in 2011, the coalition government argued that fixed-term parliaments would have a positive effect on our country’s political system: providing stability, discouraging short-termism, and preventing the manipulation of election dates for political advantage. Yet the ease with which Theresa May was able to trigger the early election in light of her 21-point opinion poll lead over Labour over Easter (2017) appeared to cast doubt on its ability to deliver these aims. Read more of this post

Meritocracy in China & Authoritarian Democracy


This week on Facebook: I decided to publish a previous post of mine (at least in part), the original has been changed and can be read here. The reason for this reprise being my wish to include the new references at ¹⁄²⁄³ in the post. I’ve also changed an article to one that doesn’t require a subscription or any ‘extra’ reading and made changes to the text, making it compatible with my current posts.

Perhaps the question to ask ourselves is, “Whether or not there is an alternative?”

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Political Systems & Democracy?


This week on Facebook:  I live in a liberal democracy and wonder why others who do support the undemocratic relentless advance of a meritocracy to govern them, or at least a soi-disant version of it. Even in the unlikely event of an electorate choosing to vote for the most meritorious representative, they are still not a privy to their elected representative’s selection by any political system as a representative of any public administration. Both meritocracy and democracy are used as abstractions in political philosophy, it is clear that both words depend on the political system of the State. Whether it is modelled on a Chinese meritocracy, a liberal democracy, the emerging European Union as a political unit, or some other form of political system, they all claim to be democratic.

The world today is divided territorially into more than 190 countries, in each of which a national government claims to exercise sovereignty—or the power of final authority—and seeks to compel obedience to its will by its citizens. Britannica: Political Systems

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On Visiting Myopia


This week on Facebook: I add this as part of my 2019 April posts on political and economic themes, in which there are two reprises that are not quite the same as the originals. However, in this post, both the article on Friday and Ian Buckley’s essay Learning from Adam Smith quote the following caution from economic historian John Kenneth Galbraith.

Corporate executives and their spokesmen who cite Smith today as the source of all sanction and truth without the inconvenience of having read him would be astonished and depressed to know he would not have allowed their companies to exist.

My first reprise has minor alterations and  he original can be read here, what follows is essentially as it was written. Read more of this post

The Land Is Ours

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The Real Economy

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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