Tag Archives: government

The Deep State


This week on Facebook: Is a kind of interlude which, to my mind, is not divorced from my previous posts. The Deep State is a term I am familiar with and a recent article reminded me of it. Regarding the recently elected President of the USA, Bill Bonner wrote in Money Week, There are many moving parts in the Deep State. Trump can try to pit one against another but he needs broad support in Congress. It is said that he has a Republican majority in the House and the Senate ready to do his bidding. This is not true. What he has — is a pack of clever self seeking politicians sharpening their long knives. Read more of this post

Free Trade?


This week on Facebook: Were I a conspiracy theorist I could be drawn to the notion that  Free Trade agreements are a means of ensuring hegemony over a democratic electorate and expanding the global authority of totalitarian regimes. Increasingly these agreements intend to penalise nation states where productivity, or lack of it, are not subsidised by the visible hand of a state’s public administration. Read more of this post

Cassandra & Growth


This week on Facebook: Am I a rabid follower of Malthus obsessed with an ever growing global population and a believer in Bartlett concerned about the consequences of ignoring the mathematical exponential function? I would like to think not, but I do suggest that a correlation between Malthus and Bartlett could be found the horse manure problem of the late nineteenth century driven by needs and wants of growing economies. Read more of this post

The Scramble for Growth!


This week on Facebook: Is prosperity and wealth the same thing I wonder.  My conclusion is that it depends on how you define each word and who that definition applies to. Oxfam¹ thinks that $8-coffee-drinking millennials with student debt are amongst the world’s neediest and they are if you define wealth without taking into account its context. A millennial who indulges in an $8 cup of coffee may not be wealthy but is certainly prosperous.

The World Economic Forum is less attention grabbing in its report² but both reports highlight the potential of persistent long-term trends, such as inequality and deepening social and political polarisation. Trends that exacerbate risks associated with, for example, the weakness of the economic recovery and the speed of technological change. Read more of this post

USA: The budget (a history)


This week on Facebook: Just before Christmas I commented on an article posted on Facebook [see Facebook — The Nation] — not something that I do very often as comments on the election that resulted in Donald Trump being nominated President of the USA and the outcome of the Brexit referendum are for the most part simply (to my mind) the ravings of the disaffected. In this case I did listen to the related podcast giving rise to the leader by Robert Reich: Why Republicans Are Wrong About Taxes, commenting that Robert Reich may well be wrong. Read more of this post

Down on the farm


This week on Facebook: I have posted some articles on factory farming, also known as intensive farming as it applies to the maintenance of livestock, a really difficult subject area that is compounded by global economics. The availability of meat in developed economies has hidden the real cost of its production both in terms of animal husbandry and environmental pollution. A world with the seemingly inexorable growth in the global population and its desire for affordable food, especially meat, would seem to be leading towards not only an environmental catastrophe but an increasing lack of human compassion. Read more of this post

Cassandra


This week on Facebook: With the election of new President having taking place in the USA on Tuesday and the global obsession with the outcome becoming a reality, I didn’t expect my articles to be widely read. So: belonging to the economically obsessed group, I posted reprises on some of my past observations. However I am not an economist or financial advisor,  nor do I claim to write with any personal professional authority.

I have thought that I should post on such matters as Cassandra  – a metaphor for cases of valid alarms that are disbelieved — and just maybe, a Trump victory in the USA presidential election will bring some reality to global economics. As painful and inflationary as that may be this global economic bubble has to burst sometime. Read more of this post

Global Tenterhooks?


This Sunday of Facebook: Despite having said to my wife that the election of a new President is entirely up to the electorate in the USA, which it is — whatever the rest of the world thinks — nevertheless I couldn’t resist having my say. Not being aware that the date for the election of a new President in the USA is next Tuesday, I am posting a selection of my intended articles today. Read more of this post

Free Trade Isn’t ‘Free or Fair’!


This week on Facebook: It would seem that the people of Wallonia determined what it was that made the world go around. At least for the EU, Canada, and a free trade deal. It was enlightening to see how the result of a democratic process that is not (necessarily) shared in other democracies could send the media into such a spin. When I wrote Free Trade — not so transparent I concluded that, Perhaps the lack of transparency in these Free Trade Agreements means very little if we assume the continuation of any discretionary income we may have, our ability to spend it where we will and its value of exchange is to our advantage. Read more of this post

Fleeced Again!


This week on Facebook: Being somewhat surprised by the scale of the political incompetence (although political connivance would fit equally well) that I came across in last week’s article on pensions, I decided that this week I would look a little deeper. I found that the sorry saga continues with perhaps the only positive slant that could be put on it would be that of politicians caring for their own stipends.  Read more of this post

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

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The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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