Tag Archives: France

Final thoughts on Les Misérables


Today on Facebook: For someone who wrote with an element of disdain about Les Misérables last week, it may be that I should have finished with the book and the latest film offering on that note. However, my research into Les Misérables led me to an old version of Slate’s Culture Brow Beat where I found an article that questioned the length of Hugo’s novel. Not wanting to distract from last weeks post, and wondering how to use the article, I placed it here¹. Read more of this post

Aasof on “Les Mis”


This week on Facebook:  Or should I say, “Everything you always wanted to know about ‘Les Mis’ but were afraid to ask”.  I like musicals but have been put off ‘Les Mis’ by colleagues who cannot fail to talk about it in anything but rapturous, perhaps even reverential tones. Whether they are waxing lyrically about a stage production, the film, a DVD or simply a CD of the music from it, their adoration of ‘Les Mis’ has driven me further and further from any desire to watch or listen to the music from ‘Les Mis’. I don’t know what conclusions I would draw were to see the show in any form.

Les Misérables by Victor Hugo has had many adaptations over time, but perhaps non that have induced the fervour of the musical adaptation than what has become known as ‘Les Mis’.

Read more of this post

German Reunification


This week on Facebook: Mainly for the benefit of my children, I should like to point out that German reunification refers to that of 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall,which led to Tag der Deutschen Einheit. This is not the same as Bismarck’s German Unification of 1850 to 1871 nor is it the 1938 AnschlussRead more of this post

Victor Hugo, Europe United, “Mais Non”


This week on Facebook: Having began the year on the topic of the EU I was attracted to an article published in Europe’s Journal of Psychology  (EJOP) — Vol 1, No 4 (2005) with the title ‘The French Vision of Europe from Victor Hugo’s United States of Europe to the No to the Constitution’ from which this week’s extracts have been taken. The EJOP contribution by Michel Viegnes offers an insight into the French psyche and the influence that Victor Hugo continues to have on it.

This EJOP article is rather long, which I have made it more readable by breaking down the paragraphs, some editorial arrangements and adding a number of links. However, despite these modifications, the paper is still intended to represent the views as written by the author. Should you wish to read the published article in EJOP, a link to it is also included below. Read more of this post

Helicopter Money


This week on Facebook: Sees me return to economics, yet more history and the despair of an old man who — like all old men before me — thinks that the world is going to hell in a handcart. My first instinct was to ignore articles on helicopter money as it being something that I was incapable of having an influence on (which is true) and finding myself totally confused by the rationales offered by economists and politicians. Nevertheless, the notion of helicopter money made me think of some historic precedents that I believe are valid allusions to its use. Read more of this post

The Siege


“So William, I beat you again!”

“Perhaps you should not brag so Georgina, when we are wed I may beat as often as I like.”

She hotly replied, “No man will ever beat me William Young, husband or not!”

Watching him as he unstrung his bow and started walking towards her, she immediately regretted her sharp-tongued reply. She remembered vividly her parents announcing her betrothal to him, the feeling of elation, the love for him. A feeling she had held from the very first moment they met, each time she looked at him love welled up inside her, so much that she thought her heart would burst.

As he approached her he said, “You are closer to the butt than me.”

“But always a better shot,” she replied. Read more of this post

The Troika & The IMF


This week on Facebook: My innate cynicism tells me that that this exercise in flagellation by the International Money Fund (IMF) issuing their critical report¹, is not a pursuit of penance but rather a manipulation of the media. The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, moves on:… and so does the IMF. The media criticism of the IMF’s handling of crises mentioned in the report, especially the crisis in Greece and that of the Eurozone, will soon be forgotten as the media also moves on. The IMF will be left to continue dispensing what is euphemistically called its aid, regardless of its efficacy to those in receipt of it. Read more of this post

Stop The World I Want To Get Off


This week on Facebook: Stop The World I Want To Get Off is a musical set against the backdrop of a circus, the show focuses on Littlechap, from the moment of his birth to his death. Each time something unsatisfactory happens, he calls out ‘Stop the world!’ and addresses the audience. In a week ending with the result of the UK referendum on membership of the EU (Brexit) a post on Syria is hardly like to excite an audience. Nevertheless my attention was caught by Monday’s article suggesting that Sykes-Picot agreement was not responsible for shaping the future of the Middle-East, following which I decided to devote this week on Facebook to Syria. Relying on the modern media for information and especially the social media, which seems to feed on unsatisfactory outcomes, encouraged me to see the world as a circus and myself as Littlechap. Read more of this post

Marrano – The Letters


Between late 1938 and July 1942, my twin brother, Abraham Francisco Hubsch, wrote to me at least once a fortnight from Paris. Our ambition was to study together at l’École de Paris, but we agreed that one of us should stay in Santa Cruz de la Sierra with Mama.  Being Marrano was just family history which, to us both, could have no relevance in this day and age. We should have listened to Mama, history does have a way of repeating itself. Here are five letters written by Abraham between 1939 and his disappearance in 1942.

Miguel Ariel Hubsch

1952 Read more of this post

That Odious Greek Debt


Der Spiegel reported in May 2010 that without bribes virtually no foreign company could do business in Greece. In How German Companies Bribed Their Way to Greek Deals, Der Speigel claimed that the money from bribery enriched industrialists, civil servants, the military and politicians.  Read more of this post

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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