Tag Archives: dystopian

The New Slick Road


This week on Facebook: I used to blog a lot on a now defunct site called My Telegraph, as did a chap who I think called himself Atrium. Eventually Atrium disappeared in a fit of pique, I think it was because he had such little response to his many cri de coeur regarding his opinions. Observing Atrium was a salutary lesson that taught me a lot about blogging and I think I understand why he left My Telegraph in such a huff. It was (at least in a large part) an ‘age’ thing, Atrium was most probably in my peer group, retired and clearly with a lot of time to spend on the social media. He had forgotten that as a younger man, when in a job and less time on his hands, any talk of putting the world to rights was invariably euphemistic and tempered by a blind faith that the democracy of our public administration lay in hands of the electorate.

My piquancy (I would hope) is not only tempered by an ever increasing understanding of the social media but also by the limitations to my curmudgeonliness. However, a recent article in MoneyWeek with the title ‘A Credit Score That Judges Your Politics’ (see Monday’s article) caused me to have an Atrium moment, a cri de coeur if you will.  Imagine a world where many of your daily activities were constantly monitored and evaluated: what you buy at the shops and online; where you are at any given time; who your friends are and how you interact with them; how many hours you spend watching content or playing video games; and what bills and taxes you pay—or not (see Tuesday’s article). Think of the world that you are already living in!

Read more of this post

We’re Here To Help!


Amy lay in bed musing waiting for the screen wake-up call, If I’d completed that course maybe I’d be socially mobile now, even qualified for a baby and a flat. Amy and her best friends had stopped attending the Societal Upgrade Course when it began interfering with their social life. One by one these friends had become untraceable, their screen access replaced by a statement that they had been selected for relocation upgrades on becoming a special case. Amy, now alone, wished that she qualified for a relocation upgrade. A release from her dreary social commitment at which she only met someone from her previous social circle when they weren’t able to avoid her. They always had a reason for not keeping in contact — even on their screen. Acquaintances now socially mobile living in upper grade socio-economic residential areas, or those living in a four roomed flat with a child and a partner. The independent life she had once led in her own bedsit, like her best friends, had gone. It was now her refuge from the social commitment, her social life now lived vicariously through the screen.

Read more of this post

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

%d bloggers like this: