Tag Archives: debt

MPs’ Pension and Yours


This week on Facebook: Having decided to delve into the realm of pensions it came as no surprise to discover that politicians spend a great effort on their own sinecures but compound the self created pensions dilemma that successive governments have imposed on others. Read more of this post

Cassandra on Pensions


This week-on-Facebook: As a retired civil servant, though not in the same league as Sir Robert (Tuesday’s  article), I have long thought that the whole pensions system — particularly that of public sector pensions — was a train wreck waiting to happen. Successive UK government consistently deferred this  forthcoming train wreck in the hope that it will not happen while they are in office, perhaps even hoping for deus ex machina. Read more of this post

It’s only money!


This week on Facebook: Trying to use last weeks post on Criminals & Taxation as a link to those that may follow at some point proved to be very difficult, the reaction of a public administration’s response to economic failure is more akin to investigative journalism than a short, singular, post. So this week I focused a little bit on factors relating to Government economic policy, with particular reference to Social Security and taxation in the UK. My post last week last week illustrated some of the financial disasters that can occur when a public administration overreaches its level of competence. In an earlier post on Debt & Taxation (2013) I began: ‘The role that economic theory plays in the creation of money and the role played by all politicians in the manipulation of economic theory for the purpose of a fiscal policy, bear little relationship to the social responsibility that Drucker applied to a private enterprise.’ Read more of this post

Criminals & Taxation


This week on Facebook: Sometime in July I read that the fraud scandal carried out at Lloyds bank took the police six years to investigate at a cost £7 million (excluding the cost of the trial). The case was dealt with by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) which, regardless of its successes and failures, as part of the public sector, has an impact on a seemingly inexorable budget deficit. It was only casually reading about the Lloyds bank case that I decided to research some of the government’s financial losses¹ for which no one, and especially not a politician or apparently any other public servant is ever held responsible. Certainly some investigative journalism usually results in a story reaching the public, it may even create a furore for a time, but the government know that any furore will eventually subsided and its cause forgotten. Yet if you are taxpayer, and even if you are not, any financial loss by the government has an impact on your well being. For a right or left leaning government, such financial losses become an excuse for increasing government debt and austerity measures. Read more of this post

Cryptocurrency, mercantilism and authoritarianism


This week on Facebook: The rise in value of cryptocurrency may be likened to an economic bubble but it is a bubble created as a result of government debts using fiat money. Last week I wrote about cryptocurrency bubbles and money and four weeks ago about the rising cryptocurrency, which led me to conclude that this is more than a speculative bubble. The rise of cryptocurrency is likely to have far reaching consequences regarding today’s governments and the money supply it attempts to control. Read more of this post

All that glisters…


All that glisters is not gold… [The merchant of Venice — Act 2 Scene 7]

Finding an article that included a simple link to cryptocurrency in support of my linking sixteenth century Spanish bullion to modern mercantilism and the desire of a sovereign power to maintain authority over what is now its fiat money was difficult. I eventually concluded that I had write my own. Debasement of the currency is the inevitable result of abandoning a monetary standard¹ that limits the money supply (or commodity money), giving credence to Keynesian economics and Modern Monetary Theory (MMT)². Read more of this post

Cryptocurrency as fiat


This week on Facebook:   When I wrote Monday’s article in 2011 about fiat money I never had in mind the cryptocurrency in last week’s post, although I was certainly aware that the ravages created by the inflationary effects of fiat money did not protect wealth. Wealth protection only comes to those with the means of investing in things whose rarity increased their value. The rise in the value of cryptocurrency, particularly as a wealth protector (like that of gold), shouldn’t really have come as the surprise it did.  Read more of this post

The rising cryptocurrency


This week on Facebook: My attention was caught yet again by shills offering fantastic returns on a financial investment. It could be harsh perhaps to use the definition of a shill as, an accomplice of a confidence trickster or swindler who poses as a genuine customer to entice or encourage others [SOED]. However, it’s implausible the think that a shill is anything other than, a person who pretends to give an impartial endorsement of something in which they themselves have an interest [SOED]. Of course the term shill, when used in this context and especially in a derogatory sense, is sure to raise a lot of resentment, especially when shills are simply responding to the volatility of an economic cycle that is the inevitable result of a fiscal policy adopted by a public administration. In today’s world the euphemism financial crisis is used to disguise actions taken by the public administration that exacerbate the economic cycle and inevitably fail to provide a stable economy. Read more of this post

Plus c’est la même chose.


This week on Facebook: There was a General Election in the UK on Thursday and perhaps for the first time in my life I found myself with a real justification for seriously declaring myself to be an Anarchist. I spoilt my postal voting slip on the basis that non of the candidates represented a leader that I would choose to be the next Prime Minister. It seems to me that the commonality shared by all the candidates and especially those who won the election (regardless of their political affiliations) will be increased government debt. Despite their declared political diversity, the party assuming power will inevitably rob Peter to pay Paul. The electorate — certainly on Facebook — thought that it was faced with a choice between conservatism and increased wealth for the few versus socialism and increased wealth for the many, when in my opinion the electorate was faced with the undeclared totalitarianism that both offered at the hustingsRead more of this post

Plus ça change


This week on Facebook: My five reprises this week reflect the epigram Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. The epigram is probably familiar to most of my generation and needs no translation (Google it), but perhaps some of my family may read my reflections so it was a somewhat cynical remark that translates as, “The more things change, the more they stay the same”. Jean Baptiste Alphonse Karr (1808-1890) wrote this epigram in the January 1849 issue of Les Guêpes (“The Wasps”), the year following the European 1848 Revolutions.  A number of broadsheets¹ at the time extolled or attacked the presidential candidates General Cavaignac and (most of them) Louis-Napoleon, both of whom Karr described as Les Guêpes.

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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