Tag Archives: debt

Cryptocurrency, mercantilism and authoritarianism


This week on Facebook: The rise in value of cryptocurrency may be likened to an economic bubble but it is a bubble created as a result of government debts using fiat money. Last week I wrote about cryptocurrency bubbles and money and four weeks ago about the rising cryptocurrency, which led me to conclude that this is more than a speculative bubble. The rise of cryptocurrency is likely to have far reaching consequences regarding today’s governments and the money supply it attempts to control. Read more of this post

All that glisters…


All that glisters is not gold… [The merchant of Venice — Act 2 Scene 7]

Finding an article that included a simple link to cryptocurrency in support of my linking sixteenth century Spanish bullion to modern mercantilism and the desire of a sovereign power to maintain authority over what is now its fiat money was difficult. I eventually concluded that I had write my own. Debasement of the currency is the inevitable result of abandoning a monetary standard¹ that limits the money supply (or commodity money), giving credence to Keynesian economics and Modern Monetary Theory (MMT)². Read more of this post

Cryptocurrency as fiat


This week on Facebook:   When I wrote Monday’s article in 2011 about fiat money I never had in mind the cryptocurrency in last week’s post, although I was certainly aware that the ravages created by the inflationary effects of fiat money did not protect wealth. Wealth protection only comes to those with the means of investing in things whose rarity increased their value. The rise in the value of cryptocurrency, particularly as a wealth protector (like that of gold), shouldn’t really have come as the surprise it did.  Read more of this post

The rising cryptocurrency


This week on Facebook: My attention was caught yet again by shills offering fantastic returns on a financial investment. It could be harsh perhaps to use the definition of a shill as, an accomplice of a confidence trickster or swindler who poses as a genuine customer to entice or encourage others [SOED]. However, it’s implausible the think that a shill is anything other than, a person who pretends to give an impartial endorsement of something in which they themselves have an interest [SOED]. Of course the term shill, when used in this context and especially in a derogatory sense, is sure to raise a lot of resentment, especially when shills are simply responding to the volatility of an economic cycle that is the inevitable result of a fiscal policy adopted by a public administration. In today’s world the euphemism financial crisis is used to disguise actions taken by the public administration that exacerbate the economic cycle and inevitably fail to provide a stable economy. Read more of this post

Plus c’est la même chose.


This week on Facebook: There was a General Election in the UK on Thursday and perhaps for the first time in my life I found myself with a real justification for seriously declaring myself to be an Anarchist. I spoilt my postal voting slip on the basis that non of the candidates represented a leader that I would choose to be the next Prime Minister. It seems to me that the commonality shared by all the candidates and especially those who won the election (regardless of their political affiliations) will be increased government debt. Despite their declared political diversity, the party assuming power will inevitably rob Peter to pay Paul. The electorate — certainly on Facebook — thought that it was faced with a choice between conservatism and increased wealth for the few versus socialism and increased wealth for the many, when in my opinion the electorate was faced with the undeclared totalitarianism that both offered at the hustingsRead more of this post

Plus ça change


This week on Facebook: My five reprises this week reflect the epigram Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. The epigram is probably familiar to most of my generation and needs no translation (Google it), but perhaps some of my family may read my reflections so it was a somewhat cynical remark that translates as, “The more things change, the more they stay the same”. Jean Baptiste Alphonse Karr (1808-1890) wrote this epigram in the January 1849 issue of Les Guêpes (“The Wasps”), the year following the European 1848 Revolutions.  A number of broadsheets¹ at the time extolled or attacked the presidential candidates General Cavaignac and (most of them) Louis-Napoleon, both of whom Karr described as Les Guêpes.

Read more of this post

Assignats and Reprises!


This week on Facebook: I keep getting economic reports that any money I may hold is in danger and that those who want to take it from are my government. That my government should seek innovative means of creating inflation is hardly a surprise, the government’s (apparent) wish dispense with money altogether and make all fiat money digital is news. Although digital money is not new concept and in todays economy is synonymous with debt, the trail blazed by a digital money economy will be complex. Not in the least — I believe — because it will lead to greater debt having to be borne by the taxpayer. In a world scramble for economic growth any public administration where all money is digital in form will find it easier to devalue their currency in a sleight of hand inflation, especially when engaged in a currency war to promote economic growth.  Read more of this post

The Scramble for Growth!


This week on Facebook: Is prosperity and wealth the same thing I wonder.  My conclusion is that it depends on how you define each word and who that definition applies to. Oxfam¹ thinks that $8-coffee-drinking millennials with student debt are amongst the world’s neediest and they are if you define wealth without taking into account its context. A millennial who indulges in an $8 cup of coffee may not be wealthy but is certainly prosperous.

The World Economic Forum is less attention grabbing in its report² but both reports highlight the potential of persistent long-term trends, such as inequality and deepening social and political polarisation. Trends that exacerbate risks associated with, for example, the weakness of the economic recovery and the speed of technological change. Read more of this post

USA: The budget (a history)


This week on Facebook: Just before Christmas I commented on an article posted on Facebook [see Facebook — The Nation] — not something that I do very often as comments on the election that resulted in Donald Trump being nominated President of the USA and the outcome of the Brexit referendum are for the most part simply (to my mind) the ravings of the disaffected. In this case I did listen to the related podcast giving rise to the leader by Robert Reich: Why Republicans Are Wrong About Taxes, commenting that Robert Reich may well be wrong. Read more of this post

Cassandra


This week on Facebook: With the election of new President having taking place in the USA on Tuesday and the global obsession with the outcome becoming a reality, I didn’t expect my articles to be widely read. So: belonging to the economically obsessed group, I posted reprises on some of my past observations. However I am not an economist or financial advisor,  nor do I claim to write with any personal professional authority.

I have thought that I should post on such matters as Cassandra  – a metaphor for cases of valid alarms that are disbelieved — and just maybe, a Trump victory in the USA presidential election will bring some reality to global economics. As painful and inflationary as that may be this global economic bubble has to burst sometime. Read more of this post

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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