Tag Archives: constitution

The Deep State & War


This week on Facebook: I returned to the subject of the Deep State, prompted by three posts on The Burning Platform. It’s difficult not to become a conspiracy theorist when reading articles on the internet, to the point at which I no longer know if I am one or not. I know that I tend to focus on those articles that support my particular views, whether or not they lead me to support a conspiratorial view is something that I’m unsure about. I post those articles that I think have at least some truth to them, and the notion of a Deep State is one of them. The problem comes in discerning the truth, which means usually widening a search of the internet, but searching for the truth on the internet is akin to searching for the holy grailRead more of this post

All that glisters…


All that glisters is not gold… [The merchant of Venice — Act 2 Scene 7]

Finding an article that included a simple link to cryptocurrency in support of my linking sixteenth century Spanish bullion to modern mercantilism and the desire of a sovereign power to maintain authority over what is now its fiat money was difficult. I eventually concluded that I had write my own. Debasement of the currency is the inevitable result of abandoning a monetary standard¹ that limits the money supply (or commodity money), giving credence to Keynesian economics and Modern Monetary Theory (MMT)². Read more of this post

Elections: Time for change?


This week on Facebook: Having returned a blank voting form in the recent general election, perhaps the result provided me with a brief moment of schadenfreude in that it brought about party political, and most importantly, electoral anarchy. It also confounded the pundits who are now trying to rationalise the result and the electoral reformists who are trying to capitalise on it. What seems to be lacking in articles on electoral reform is the notion of making members of parliament (MPs) responsible to the whole of their electorate and giving a voice to the increasing rise in the electorate who spoil their voting slip or who withhold their votes completely. Read more of this post

Back to the future?


The 2017 General Election resulted in the following statistic to which caught my attention and an article by a blogger who calls himself Archbishop Cranmer giving it some rational (perhaps there is some significance in choosing the name of a Tudor protestant martyr).  Cranmer’s article on the outcome of the general election votes for Labour provides a right wing take on the statistic crediting Corbyn’s achievement. However, it is a misleading statistic in the sense that while it shows a significant increase in Labour’s vote share at the 2017 general election, as in 2015 the vote swing to Labour over the Conservatives was not enough to win them the election. In the days of a two party state in British politics, Corbyn’s increased vote share would have translated into the election victories achieved by Attlee in 1945 and Blair in 1997. So why didn’t it? Read more of this post

Zero Hours Contracts


This week on Facebook: At one of my monthly pie and a pint meetings with a friend (who is also ex-colleague), experiences in our own families had made us both aware of the difficulty in finding some form of permanent or at least longer term re-employment. This led to the subject of zero hour contracts and my subsequent research into them. For a couple of retired ex-civil servants who remembered the post WWII boom in full employment, the realities confronting those seeking employment in today’s commercial climate were brought home (quite literally) to both of us.  Read more of this post

The Deep State


This week on Facebook: Is a kind of interlude which, to my mind, is not divorced from my previous posts. The Deep State is a term I am familiar with and a recent article reminded me of it. Regarding the recently elected President of the USA, Bill Bonner wrote in Money Week, There are many moving parts in the Deep State. Trump can try to pit one against another but he needs broad support in Congress. It is said that he has a Republican majority in the House and the Senate ready to do his bidding. This is not true. What he has — is a pack of clever self seeking politicians sharpening their long knives. Read more of this post

Misleading Cases: Reprise


This week on Facebook: It occurs to me in reading the misleading cases of A. P. Herbert that they are as relevant today as at the time they were written. Their context may be somewhat different and certainly society’s views on the freedom the individual are, but the law — far from being less oppressive — insidiously tightens its grip over individual freedoms. Read more of this post

USA: The budget (a history)


This week on Facebook: Just before Christmas I commented on an article posted on Facebook [see Facebook — The Nation] — not something that I do very often as comments on the election that resulted in Donald Trump being nominated President of the USA and the outcome of the Brexit referendum are for the most part simply (to my mind) the ravings of the disaffected. In this case I did listen to the related podcast giving rise to the leader by Robert Reich: Why Republicans Are Wrong About Taxes, commenting that Robert Reich may well be wrong. Read more of this post

Brexit — the adolescent vote


This week on Facebook: The Brexit referendum led me to research the impact 18-34 year old voters could have had on the outcome and why they didn’t. In a nutshell it’s very simple, they either didn’t vote in large enough numbers or had not registered to vote in the first place¹. To quote Ralph Nader —

We have the most prolonged adolescence in the history of mankind.

Read more of this post

Brexit and the UK


This week on Facebook: Not a believer in referendums — at least not those in the UK that turn a simple democracy into a mobile vulgus ochlocracy. I didn’t vote in the one last week on Brexit but in terms of UK democracy, last week’s Brexit referendum vote was as democratic as any electoral or parliamentary vote and more democratic — in terms of the popular vote turnout — than any other post war referendum. Read more of this post

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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