Tag Archives: budget

Inflation!


This week on Facebook: Last Sunday I tried to show the inflationary effect of fiat money that was introduced at Bretton Woods in 1971. While I think it was something that I failed to do successfully, I may have indicated how difficult it is to arrive at a figure for inflation that is not subject to government fiscal policy. Read more of this post

Sunday 28/7/2019


I did consider withdrawing this post, but it has made me look at ‘Measuring Worth‘ in a new light and is useful to me. Specifically it made me consider how complex the issue of inflation actually is in a fiat money world. Especially in the light of the Retail Price Index and the Consumer Price Index that comprise the items making up the UK’s ‘shopping baskets’.

The best that I could do was to measure the value of one pound (UK) using three sequential periods from 1947 until 1970 and from 1972 until 2018. I missed out 1971 as it was the year that fiat money was introduced into the global economy. Even so the cost of inflation to the consumer for a basket of goods not included in the RPI or CPI indices was hard to identify. This is particularly true of groceries that are considered to be a necessary expenditure. Food is approximately 10% of the basket depending on the percentage variability of the other included items.  The following notes below point out that measurements of inflation are based on a fiscal policy that is related to the RPI, CPI indices.

Read more of this post

UK Pensions & Politicians


This week on Facebook: Politicians in the UK (and elsewhere) apparently assume that economic recovery is achievable through austerity and a reduction in public debt. However, a self-serving governing elite ensure that deficit financing ensnares us all while they remain immune to the austerity measures imposed. This is particularly true of pension inequality when UK members of parliament have their pensions determined by a notionally¹ Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (IPSA). Read more of this post

Cassandra on Money & Debt


Read more of this post

Cassandra on the greatest illusion!


¯This week on Facebook: The ascendancy of unconstrained finance has always been a feature of wealth and poverty, exacerbated in 1981 (and since) by the cost of a social welfare programme. With deficit financing used to increase the inevitable shortfall in government budgets and the cost being borne by a fiscal policy that is an increasing burden on the taxpayer already burdened with government financial errors.

The greatest illusion held in the UK and becoming prevalent globally, is that the State will always provide a social welfare programme that mitigates its users from the effects of any austerity.

State prediction of economic growth have not been realised and the general public have, of recent years, mostly been subjected to austerity. This austerity is created by debts encouraged by The City and low incomes encouraged by State fiscal policy.

Read more of this post

Public Investment?


This week on Facebook: In 2008 I wrote an article about privatisation under a New Labour government, in which The Guardian newspaper figured prominently. Some eight years later I am still writing about the sale of pubic assets, with the media on the left now writing in support of a ‘Labour’ opposition party and highly critical regarding the sale of public assets. At least this time around The Guardian has been more honest, if still remaining somewhat circumspect↔ about the part that the New Labour Administration played in the sale and funding  of public assets (1). Read more of this post

Cassandra on debt


This week on Facebook: I can’t think of an answer to a financial dilemma constantly driven by political imperatives and am not so conceited that I would ever try to suggest one¹Regression at my age is a common occurrence and my diffuse dissatisfactions increase day by day, with my belief that the world “is going to hell in a handcart”. On becoming an octogenarian next May what other view would I hold! Perhaps my interest in history is an expression of that regression. I constantly regard events as being a case of “one step forward two steps back” and history replete with stories of debt.  Read more of this post

Cassandra on World Debt


This week on Facebook: I am repeating myself here, in my 2011 post with the title ‘A Universal Debt!’ I recalled, “That someone looked into world indebtedness and facetiously drew the conclusion that The Earth must be in debt to the rest of The Universe. This was because every country in the world had an external debt load (barring about three). Obviously the earth is not in debt to someone else in the universe — unless you are a conspiracy theorist — but it is true that there is a global indebtedness.  What really matters, is not the debt, but the ability to pay off the debt with the interest that the debt accrues and the consequences of any inability to do this.” [sic]

All classes alike thus build their plans, the rich to spend more and save less, the poor to spend more and work less. John Maynard Keynes (1919)

For those of us living in the Western world global debt is something that the majority of its citizens do not take seriously as no end is foreseen to the ever increasing economic growth of the Western world. Today global debt is increased and the global citizenry has increased along with its indifference to deficit finance becoming the norm. Matt’s following cartoon repeats that joke, but as Yanis Varoufakis writes in his book ‘Adults In The Room’, politicians and their financiers are using world debt to ensnare us all in a global plutocracy.

Read more of this post

Cassandra on Money & Debt


Read more of this post

Cash is subversive (2)


The following is a brief extract from ‘Big Brother Loves You!’ by Detlev Schlichter in which he rails against fiat money and the creation of debt something that I touched on in A Universal Debt. Commenting on the trend towards interventionist policies and assertive state action, The Economist and the Financial Times talk of the trend towards ‘repression’ and ‘national capitalism’ in crisis management. The public believe that greedy bankers and ‘unfettered capitalism’ brought about this crisis. Yet cheap credit through state fiat money and the systematic subsidisation of the housing market, are not features of the free market but of politics. Read more of this post

Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

%d bloggers like this: