Tag Archives: book

What is the EU?


This week on Facebook: Following a defeat (yet again) of Theresa May’s Brexit plan by the UK parliament, the following may be of interest. They are articles on Brexit provided by the USA (European Union), Al-Jazeera (European Union News), Germany (European Union), and a video (7min) providing a good description of how the EU actually works.

It’s impossible to discuss the European Union¹ (EU) without mentioning Brexit and I have written a lot about the EU — often with a somewhat cynical view about Brexit. It has been my assumption (wrongly as it turns out) that people knew what the EU was, what it had become and where it was heading! Where the EU is heading is a difficult question to answer and one that only provides hypothetical answers, especially when the question is asked in the context, “What is the EU?”. Read more of this post

The Rule of Law, Remorse, Shamima Begum


This week on Facebook: Last year I posted ‘A law to cure!‘. The question that we continually seem face and perhaps should address is the need for new laws and changes to old ones. The English resort to the magna-carta as a source of their rights in Common Law and in response I posted Magna Carta: No longer law.

The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Oscar Wilde

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Compassion, Gershwin, & a quiz


24/2/2019 — Sunday on Facebook: I have been trying to write a post about compassion fatigue for some time now. The compassion fatigue I want to write about is not that experienced in the so-called helping professions who know as much about the limits of empathy as they do about its merits. Studies of oncology nurses, trauma workers and even marriage counsellors, among others, have documented a common “compassion fatigue” that seems directly related to the amount of emotion shared. What I wanted to write about is the compassion fatigue that we all experience when reports in the media makes us become compassionately numb. Read more of this post

Frankenstein and AI


This week on Facebook: Sometime in the early 90s I remarked to my European colleagues that supermarkets were turning us all into ‘battery hens’, in that we were all (however unwittingly) in thrall to the power of ‘marketers’ who exerted influence over our buying habits. I had no thoughts at the time that Artificial Intelligence (AI) would make my remark in the early 90s prescient and how the ‘battery hen’ analogy, when applied to AI, would have an increasing impact on all aspects of our lives.

It is true, we shall be monsters, cut off from all the world; but on that account we shall be more attached to one another. Our lives will not be happy, but they will be harmless and free from the misery I now feel. Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Books & my (occasional) anecdote


This week on Facebook: It’s Christmas week —

A Very Happy Christmas

to You All

And

My Best Wishes For The New Year

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Yet more A. P. Herbert!


This week on Facebook: I have loved reading A. P. Herbert’s parodies of the law in Misleading Cases. Having followed the legal escapades of Albert Haddock on television, although the series was not entirely true to the storyline. However, my favourite A. P. Herbert character from the books is Sir Ethelred Rutt, used last week as the model for the protagonist in my story ‘Men in Black’. Herbert didn’t always use the same characters in his stories and I’m sure that he would disparage the world in which we now live. In the last story, I’m sure that the abilities involved in the letters that Mr Sleep wrote are now superseded by in the inabilities of those writing ubiquitous emails. Read more of this post

It’s Quite OK to Walk Away:


This Sunday on Facebook: My ambivalence towards the EU remains unabated as do my feelings of the disparity held by those who would subscribe to a return of a British democracy, or those who would choose to remain in the EU (even assuming that a consensus on what either meant existed). I stand by the resolve that I hold, in that the decision to choose between two oligarchies is for voters other than myself to decide. I shall be 80 next year and will (perhaps) not live to witness the long term results of the chosen outcome. Read more of this post

Public Debt


This week on Facebook: As I posted in Cassandra on debt and as I had previously conclude in my 2013 post Crisis and Credit, the issue of public debt is used as an excuse for a fiscal policy of austerity measures, yet it is private debt that is behind the fiscal crisis. The State (particularly in the UK) does more to encourage private debt than to control it. Conversely the State continues with its fiscal policy of increasing public debt¹, something that I wrote about in Debt, the prolific mother (2012). Read more of this post

What is GDP?


This week on Facebook: I have remarked in my posts rather a lot on Global Inequality, that while there is a lot of media coverage given over to global inequality there is little indication that it has prompted any mass national desire for global equality. The populations of developed nations may well be aware of just how much they share with the other populations in the developed and developing word (at least in terms of a notional national wealth). My post on Global Inequality asks the question, “Just how equal do we want the world to be?”  The answers would suggest that the wrong question is being asked and that — perhaps — those with a large measure of a quality of life should be asked, “What are they prepared to give up?”. Read more of this post

The Value of Money


  This week on Facebook: In ‘The Coming Dark Ages?’ I criticised all the articles for failing to point out that (in my view) the prevalence of an economic global hegemony by Western Philosophy relied on a reserve currency in a fiat money world. Money at the centre of globalisation, whether it is trade or war that is the dominant driving force for global economic growth. I was especially critical of the article America enters the dark ages concluding that in my opinion money, war and a rising nationalism, are the most likely harbingers in any coming of a new dark age.
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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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