Category Archives: Technology

The Future & AI


This week on Facebook: A video that I posted two week ago ended with the question, “What would you do if you never had to die?“. As someone who is going to be an octogenarian this year the question was an initial no-brainer, I would leap at the chance (especially if it repaired my short term memory failings at the same time). Then I began to think about what being human meant and the more I thought about it, the more my initial reaction began to change. Read more of this post

Frankenstein and AI


This week on Facebook: Sometime in the early 90s I remarked to my European colleagues that supermarkets were turning us all into ‘battery hens’, in that we were all (however unwittingly) in thrall to the power of ‘marketers’ who exerted influence over our buying habits. I had no thoughts at the time that Artificial Intelligence (AI) would make my remark in the early 90s prescient and how the ‘battery hen’ analogy, when applied to AI, would have an increasing impact on all aspects of our lives.

It is true, we shall be monsters, cut off from all the world; but on that account we shall be more attached to one another. Our lives will not be happy, but they will be harmless and free from the misery I now feel. Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

What Is Artificial Intelligence (AI)?


This week on Facebook: Last Sunday I posted a video that is linked to the following videos on Artificial Intelligence (AI). I started delving deeper into the nature of AI although in the past I have written a lot about AI, with my 2012 post ‘Is it bird? Is it a plane? No it’s a bid!’ concluding by asking if artificial intelligence (AI) had finally opened Pandora’s Box leaving hope locked inside? Read more of this post

AI for the nontechnical


This Sunday on Facebook: If you think that you are nontechnical, think again, the mere fact that have ended up on this page places you amongst an ever growing family of ‘AI nerds‘ however nontechnical you deem yourself to be. Read more of this post

A Digital Dark Age?


This week on Facebook:  Last week was not referring to the digital dark age but rather to the coming dark age predicted, in my mind,  in a very large part to the philosophies of Thomas Malthus and Professor Albert Bartlett. I wrote about Thomas Malthus in  Malthus and Growth and mentioning both Malthus and Bartlett in Cassandra & Growth, both of which were posted early last year.  Read more of this post

Aasof on Democracy!


This week on Facebook: Following my reading of the articles in Bloomberg’s Weekend Edition (This Week was China Week), it’s apparent that we are committed to ideologies, politicians in particular — in my view — being particularly committed to the authoritarian ideology of China’s master plan, which I posted this month. However, in whatever form they may come in, the adherence to a particular ideology produces its own zealots. Comments on the social media confirm this view, but what about the many more who do not involve themselves in ideological discussions! Read more of this post

Inequality & Technology


This week on Facebook: The subject of global inequality is clearly one that presents a global dilemma in the search for a rational between the inequalities that economic growth has introduced with the advances in technology¹. The latter being this week’s subject as the harbinger of global inequality that is now being experienced by the developed worldWould that it were that simple, but many more factors are involved and while a scapegoat for global economic woes may be desirable, its use is only papering over the cracks that are now being revealed.

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Google Ngram


Google provide a programme called the Ngram Viewer, which enables the tracing of words or phrases as they have been used in books over the centuries. At a recent regular meeting with an ex-colleague of mine, we discussed  wealth, prosperity and happiness, in the context of growth and inequality. The problem withe Ngram is the context in which the words are being used, by whom, when and for what purpose. Read more of this post

Aasof on Cyborgs


This week on Facebook: Increasingly there is a notion that our cyborg traits are in conflict with those traits that determine our ethics and that of our humanity,  and yet for the centuries, scientists speculated that we could tap into the body’s system to restore lost functions or enhance our powers, like machines. The concept of acupuncture, which began in China at least 2,500 years ago, premised that there are essential patterns of energy flow (Qi) throughout the body. Modern human cybernetic enhancements emulate the stimuli flowing throughout the body by creating pulses of electrical energy.

Perhaps it is always the human creative ability to form images, ideas, and sensations in the mind without any immediate input of the senses, and an innate ability to invent partial or complete personal realms within the mind from sense perceptions of a shared world that has led to our success as a species. Such imaginings are readily recognised in an artistic world, for example; literature, writing, art, poetry, but imagineering is hardly ever given recognition and credit in the technological world. Yet it may well be the artistic world of imagineering that has led to this world of cyborgs.

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The Grauniad — Christmas 2017


For those who are not aware of the pre-Internet age, this was the early days of computing, for the amateur enthusiast PCs were unaffordable but motherboard kits were available, which cost more than some modern Notebooks. It was so long ago the term geek wasn’t in common use. For excited techies the kit they’d assembled was programmed in machine code and loaded by cassette tape as floppy discs were expensive (a simple program could take 15 minutes to load). In fact all memory was expensive at that time.

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The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

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Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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