Category Archives: social-media

A Reprise for Sunday


This Sunday on Facebook: I offer a reprise from July 2018 as a link to next week posts in which there is a repeat of 2 songs. Those who may be fans of The Great American  Songbook like me (greatly influenced by my mother), may enjoy this Sunday’s reprise. I assure you that although next week’s offering also includes 5 (posted) videos, they are different, as is the theme of my post.

The following are extracts taken from my July 2018 of Aasof on The Great American Songbook and are about my 2 repeats next week, although both are by different artists and intended to add to my question next week: Are Lyricists Poets?

Unlike the instrumental piece composed by Lionel Hampton and Sonny Burke in 1947 with lyrics added in 1954 by Johnny Mercer. Midnight Sun became famous as a jazz standard and is certainly (currently) one of my favourites.

Begin The Beguine was written by Cole Porter for the Broadway show Jubilee  in 1935. Begin The Beguine has a set of lyrics that are hard to remember and a melody that is difficult to forget (at least the opening bars). It’s interesting that it was Artie Shaw’s instrumental version that was a big hit in 1938.

A Golden Shield and A Great Cannon


This week on Facebook: In researching ‘internet censorship’ the question of ‘control‘ is a word frequently used but I’m not convinced that it is correct. Control of the internet is simply the means to an end and it is the regulations a State applies to internet use that determines its use. In other words State control, through regulations backed by the law that the State applies as ‘rules’ to its use¹. Read more of this post

The Rule of Law, Remorse, Shamima Begum


This week on Facebook: Last year I posted ‘A law to cure!‘. The question that we continually seem face and perhaps should address is the need for new laws and changes to old ones. The English resort to the magna-carta as a source of their rights in Common Law and in response I posted Magna Carta: No longer law.

The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Oscar Wilde

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Compassion, Gershwin, & a quiz


24/2/2019 — Sunday on Facebook: I have been trying to write a post about compassion fatigue for some time now. The compassion fatigue I want to write about is not that experienced in the so-called helping professions who know as much about the limits of empathy as they do about its merits. Studies of oncology nurses, trauma workers and even marriage counsellors, among others, have documented a common “compassion fatigue” that seems directly related to the amount of emotion shared. What I wanted to write about is the compassion fatigue that we all experience when reports in the media makes us become compassionately numb. Read more of this post

Cassandra on Money & Debt


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Books & my (occasional) anecdote


This week on Facebook: It’s Christmas week —

A Very Happy Christmas

to You All

And

My Best Wishes For The New Year

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Anecdotes & other things


This week on Facebook: Some of these are also stories but some are anecdotal, the first is one is a records my reactions (and thoughts) to true happenings. The second is a review, written as a literary  response and which is still recording a high number of ‘reads’ on my posts (perhaps it was the reference to Swinburne) . The third was an interesting search project, whereby I added fictional characterisations to true events used to embellish my original story Marrano. The last two are ‘anecdotal’ about my life (well: sort of). Read more of this post

Yet more A. P. Herbert!


This week on Facebook: I have loved reading A. P. Herbert’s parodies of the law in Misleading Cases. Having followed the legal escapades of Albert Haddock on television, although the series was not entirely true to the storyline. However, my favourite A. P. Herbert character from the books is Sir Ethelred Rutt, used last week as the model for the protagonist in my story ‘Men in Black’. Herbert didn’t always use the same characters in his stories and I’m sure that he would disparage the world in which we now live. In the last story, I’m sure that the abilities involved in the letters that Mr Sleep wrote are now superseded by in the inabilities of those writing ubiquitous emails. Read more of this post

Short Stories


This week on Facebook: I have decided to have a lazy December, which turned out to be not as lazy as I had assumed. Nevertheless: December 2018 is going to feature reprises from Aasof’s Reflections beginning with some short stories that I have enjoyed writing. Clearly my first love is web research and I have enjoyed writing and researching material for all of my short stories. The following (in chronological order) are a selection of those that I enjoyed writing and researching the most.


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Welfare on a Global Scale?


This week on Facebook: The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations (UN) makes reference to social security and the economic, social and cultural rights of ‘the common people’¹. The UN’s writing of economic rights first is to my mind quite deliberate, in that without them any social and cultural rights look set to fall. However, finding a meaningful definition of economic and cultural rights has been difficult and resulted in my resorting to podcasts. While the podcasts have the titles ‘Economic Rights’ and Cultural Rights in the 20th Century, both lead to the question of human rights (4).

The European Union (EU) attaches great importance to the interdependence of all human rights and consider economic, social and cultural rights as part of a social welfare program that may well constrain the development of the EU (5). These issues also constrain the actions of the United Nations (UN) to a degree but are an essential part of any Group of 20 (G20) social welfare programmes, where the ratio of gross domestic product (GDP) to any social welfare programme that a G20 State has affects the forecast of future economic growth.

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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