Category Archives: Social

Social Transformation


This week on Facebook: Last week I wrote that Peter Drucker’s thoughts will remain an important part of the debate on the legitimacy and functions of the corporation but as part of a world increasingly different from that in which he developed his ideas. While the developed world may now eschew religion (in any form), it constantly seeks to find some philosophical thoughts to replace it with and those philosophical thoughts of Drucker’s are no exception. Collectively I think that the internet, and in particular the social media, always provides a means of finding or creating a notional truth. Those in a search of a truth to lead their life by, and which concurs with their notions of social responsibility, become zealots in advocating such truth when they find it. I have a very dystopian view of a future, one in which I find myself increasingly cynical regarding the use that Drucker’s views on social change have been put to by the private sector and public administrations. Read more of this post

Aasof on Poetry


This week on Facebook: The final selection is an article on the subject of poetry, if not entirely bringing an end to my respite from matters economic and political, at least giving myself a break from them during the August holiday month. The subject of literature is very much influenced by personal tastes, which is reflected in my choice of poems here.

Last week’s post on essays was probably the one area where the subjects of English Literature and English Grammar overlapped when I was at school. Teachers bent on finding a budding essayists or perhaps a poet, expected us all to wax lyrical over all things. Yet, perhaps, the agony of reading terrible essays in English Grammar was nothing compared to the gauche attempts at poetry made in English Literature. I suspect that it was poetry that caused the unwilling writer and the unfortunate reader the most distress. Read more of this post

On approaching 80


This week of Facebook: Is pure self-indulgence — a birthday present to myself if you will — I was born on Sunday 21 May 1939 and today I became 78 years old. I shall be 84 and then 89 the next time my birthday falls on a Sunday, which looks about as far ahead as I have planned the crop rotation in my garden.

As a change I have indulged myself with an advance of my own articles (reprises) that didn’t have a social media, political or economic theme. Finding them turned out to be quite difficult but 20012 was a good year for this. Since then I have (perhaps) become increasingly curmudgeonly. I was surprised — although I shouldn’t have been — at the influence of rhyming verse! Read more of this post

Social Media & Post Truth


This week on Facebook: Probably — like most people — I had always assumed that I could find articles on the internet that matched my expectation of the truth.  I never thought for a moment that I may be subjected to a form of social media brainwashing. This deliberate act by the providers of social media  services may have certain advantages when researching the internet but non more so than those offered to sources who wish to influence or — more usually — reinforce opinions that are already held. Read more of this post

Social Media as a Safe Space


This week on Facebook: It seems that however careful you are in your use of the internet it’s wrong to assume that you are in a safe space. This is particularly true if you interact with the social media and assume it to be the bastion of free expression that democracy allows. The  free expression and the rule of law assumed by you may not be interpreted the same way by others. Read more of this post

Social Media — A Hall of Mirrors


This week on Facebook While my post last week implied that those advocates of digital freedom claimed to have clear missions about their defence of free speech or freedom of expression, any ethos of intent in their mission would seem to be lost in the public’s use of social media. The social media used by the public is rife with abusers¹ who believe that their anonymity coupled with their misconceptions about free speech or freedom of expression protects them. In an age of transparencysocial media covers more than is even shown in the following ethnographic. The public’s social interaction on the internet² is mainly limited to those internet sites referred to in the prominent examples of social media and in adding comments to other media outlets when permitted to do so.  Read more of this post

Free Expression In An Age Of Transparency


This week on Facebook I was reminded of words used by the Director of Public Prosecutions in a speech on Free Expression and the Rule of Law in 2008:

“An opinion, in and of itself, cannot be criminal. Ever. Just as the law should not attack thought, it should also be slow to proscribe speech or expression simply because it is capable of causing offence”.

“If you want to be able to say things that others don’t like or find challenging, you need to be willing to hear things that you don’t like”.

Read more of this post

Free Trade — not so transparent


This week on Facebook I intended to post some links on the age of transparency. This interest in transparency was prompted by a comment on a previous post, perhaps itself prompted by the recent revelations of the Panama Papers. Papers which raised great cries of indignation around the world and which will inevitably lead to less transparency in regard to their revelations. My web research for articles on transparency led me to conclude that we are living in an age of pseudo transparency, in which administrations, whatever their political hue, will constantly seek greater control over the pseudo transparency they permit. Articles on transparency are not easy to find, in fact the opposite is the case, there is a concerted effort to counteract and, where possible, suppress articles in the social media that could lead to any opposition an administration’s viewpoint. Read more of this post

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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