Category Archives: Media

The Deep State


This week on Facebook: Is a kind of interlude which, to my mind, is not divorced from my previous posts. The Deep State is a term I am familiar with and a recent article reminded me of it. Regarding the recently elected President of the USA, Bill Bonner wrote in Money Week, There are many moving parts in the Deep State. Trump can try to pit one against another but he needs broad support in Congress. It is said that he has a Republican majority in the House and the Senate ready to do his bidding. This is not true. What he has — is a pack of clever self seeking politicians sharpening their long knives. Read more of this post

Free Trade?


This week on Facebook: Were I a conspiracy theorist I could be drawn to the notion that  Free Trade agreements are a means of ensuring hegemony over a democratic electorate and expanding the global authority of totalitarian regimes. Increasingly these agreements intend to penalise nation states where productivity, or lack of it, are not subsidised by the visible hand of a state’s public administration. Read more of this post

Robotics & AI


This week on Facebook: It is very difficult to draw any conclusions from my incursion into the world of robotics and AI other than (perhaps) it being  an inevitable step in human evolution. Inevitable in the sense that — regardless of the political motivations — there is a global scramble for economic growth and global economic hegemony. There are many scenarios that can be speculated on regarding any outcome to this scramble and naturally I would look for an analogy in the history of humankind, at the moment being drawn to the European revolutions of 1846, something I touched on in The Patriot. The inevitable outcome of any trade war in this scramble for global dominance in economic growth being  military war. Read more of this post

Cassandra Redux


This week on Facebook: I have been led to Robotics and Artificial Intelligence [AI], something that I briefly touched on in 2012 when I posted Is it bird? Is it a plane? No it’s a bid!  Robotics and AI are more than an adjunct to last month’s Facebook posts about global growth in which Malthus and Bartlett figured predominantly. I posited that they were considered a Cassandra, predicting disasters that never materialised and we seem to live in a world where being labelled a Cassandra is now rather passé. Perhaps its because predictions of a bleak future for the human race abound but are ignored in the political drive for economic growth that has become the overriding factor subsuming all other considerations. This urge for economic growth may well be a driving force in the ever increasing use of robotics and AI, something that radically alters the theories propounded by Malthus and Bartlett.  Read more of this post

Assignats and Reprises!


This week on Facebook: I keep getting economic reports that any money I may hold is in danger and that those who want to take it from are my government. That my government should seek innovative means of creating inflation is hardly a surprise, the government’s (apparent) wish dispense with money altogether and make all fiat money digital is news. Although digital money is not new concept and in todays economy is synonymous with debt, the trail blazed by a digital money economy will be complex. Not in the least — I believe — because it will lead to greater debt having to be borne by the taxpayer. In a world scramble for economic growth any public administration where all money is digital in form will find it easier to devalue their currency in a sleight of hand inflation, especially when engaged in a currency war to promote economic growth.  Read more of this post

Cassandra & Growth


This week on Facebook: Am I a rabid follower of Malthus obsessed with an ever growing global population and a believer in Bartlett concerned about the consequences of ignoring the mathematical exponential function? I would like to think not, but I do suggest that a correlation between Malthus and Bartlett could be found the horse manure problem of the late nineteenth century driven by needs and wants of growing economies. Read more of this post

The Scramble for Growth!


This week on Facebook: Is prosperity and wealth the same thing I wonder.  My conclusion is that it depends on how you define each word and who that definition applies to. Oxfam¹ thinks that $8-coffee-drinking millennials with student debt are amongst the world’s neediest and they are if you define wealth without taking into account its context. A millennial who indulges in an $8 cup of coffee may not be wealthy but is certainly prosperous.

The World Economic Forum is less attention grabbing in its report² but both reports highlight the potential of persistent long-term trends, such as inequality and deepening social and political polarisation. Trends that exacerbate risks associated with, for example, the weakness of the economic recovery and the speed of technological change. Read more of this post

Malthus & Growth


This week on Facebook: In simple terms the Malthusian Trap predicts that population growth will always reach the point where it curtails human progress and leads to its inevitable decline. I have followed articles on the theory of population growth and noticed that generally they are more optimistic than I am about the societal effect of such growth. The focus of most articles is on the ability to be innovative in finding solutions to a growing global population. In doing so the conclusions drawn make a lot of undefined assumptions, with the main one being that of ignoring the indigent.   Read more of this post

Foundations of Virtue?


This week on Facebook: There has been a lot of media furore over Donald Trump’s election as the 45th President of the USA and I could post five articles in a similar vein to those below about ‘The Trump Foundation’. What is clear to me is that a number of these political foundations are used to fund an ongoing quasi-political lifestyle for the foundation members and more importantly can be seen as sellers of political influence for donations. The fact that foreign governments — as in Australia (Friday’s article) — use their taxpayers monies to buy such influence should cause a national outrage. National administrations, which notionally term themselves democratic, are only able to behave in this kleptocratic manner when their electorate is largely indifferent. If the reported fall in donations to the Clinton Foundation are not an indication of how a foundation operates a pay to play policy, what is? Read more of this post

Misleading Cases: Reprise


This week on Facebook: It occurs to me in reading the misleading cases of A. P. Herbert that they are as relevant today as at the time they were written. Their context may be somewhat different and certainly society’s views on the freedom the individual are, but the law — far from being less oppressive — insidiously tightens its grip over individual freedoms. Read more of this post

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Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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