Category Archives: Media

Trouble in Paradise?


This week on Facebook: Blissful ignorance, Tax Havens and the Paradise Papers —

To each his suff’rings: all are men,
         Condemn’d alike to groan,
The tender for another’s pain;
         Th’ unfeeling for his own.
Yet ah! why should they know their fate?
Since sorrow never comes too late,
         And happiness too swiftly flies.
Thought would destroy their paradise.
No more; where ignorance is bliss,
       ‘Tis folly to be wise.

Thomas Gray —Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College

Read more of this post

MPs’ Pension and Yours


This week on Facebook: Having decided to delve into the realm of pensions it came as no surprise to discover that politicians spend a great effort on their own sinecures but compound the self created pensions dilemma that successive governments have imposed on others. Read more of this post

Fiscal Policy and the NUM Pension Fund


This week on Facebook: Last week’s post was about pensions  and the political fiscal chicanery that successive governments have adopted to steal pension funds and hide their connivance in keeping public sector pensions ‘off the books’. On Sunday I posted a short exert from the television series ‘Yes Minister’, which indicates that the public sector pensions deficit is not a new political issue. What is rarely written about is the financial burden of the funds required to service the pensions of politicians, but perhaps more importantly, how the pensions and contributions of politicians are not subject to the same vagaries as other pensions. Read more of this post

Cassandra on Pensions


This week-on-Facebook: As a retired civil servant, though not in the same league as Sir Robert (Tuesday’s  article), I have long thought that the whole pensions system — particularly that of public sector pensions — was a train wreck waiting to happen. Successive UK government consistently deferred this  forthcoming train wreck in the hope that it will not happen while they are in office, perhaps even hoping for deus ex machina. Read more of this post

Virtual Vicariousness


This week on Facebook: I decided to follow up my theme from last week to write about the virtual reality, and what is often the vicarious reality of time spent online. It is hardly surprising to find that virtual reality had taken on the form political protest, it would appear that the fictional dystopian world so often predicted, continues towards its political reality. It was thought that social media networks would herald the advent of a true democracy instead it has unleashed an anarchy. As more people gain access to social media networks, they add to the many diverse opinions already promoted on them. Read more of this post

An Unsociable Social Media


This week on Facebook: There is some comfort to be had at my being in my dotage, but I am not immune to the way in which the vagaries of life are presented on the internet and its social media, often disrupting my comfort zone. I am irritated by those campaigns described as Alt (alternative) something or other, or those that wish to expunge history and only allow a selectively biased view of it to be presented.

Read more of this post

The Lammy Review


This week on Facebook: The Lammy Review¹ — An independent review into the treatment of, and outcomes for, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) Individuals in the Criminal Justice System — caught my attention this week. Eventually I realised that there were (at least) two ways of interpreting it, primarily, either it was ‘Review’ that could be ignored unless it lead to a further ‘Report’ requiring political action, or it was a ‘Review’ the outcome of which was the ‘Report’ set by the review’s terms of reference. Calling the ‘Report’ a ‘Review’ was not helped by my inability to find a definition by the UK government that differentiated between the two, my cynicism leading me to conclude that describing it as ‘an independent review’ is civil service Mandarin for ‘file and forget’. Read more of this post

No Hiding Place


This week on Facebook: Ignoring the additional online security problems that users of Facebook are confronted with, I decided to focus on the nothing to hide view that is especially prevalent in a government’s attitude to online surveillance and privacy.  Read more of this post

Social Transformation


This week on Facebook: Last week I wrote that Peter Drucker’s thoughts will remain an important part of the debate on the legitimacy and functions of the corporation but as part of a world increasingly different from that in which he developed his ideas. While the developed world may now eschew religion (in any form), it constantly seeks to find some philosophical thoughts to replace it with and those philosophical thoughts of Drucker’s are no exception. Collectively I think that the internet, and in particular the social media, always provides a means of finding or creating a notional truth. Those in a search of a truth to lead their life by, and which concurs with their notions of social responsibility, become zealots in advocating such truth when they find it. I have a very dystopian view of a future, one in which I find myself increasingly cynical regarding the use that Drucker’s views on social change have been put to by the private sector and public administrations. Read more of this post

Drucker & Social Responsibility


This week on Facebook: Last week in It’s only money! I quoted Peter Drucker, for those who may not be familiar with his works, and perhaps the younger millennials in particular, this week is devoted to my take on the man. On his death (aged 95) in 2005 he was described by a Bloomberg Business Week article as The Man Who Invented Management, I much prefer the subheading ‘Why Peter Drucker’s ideas still matter’. Read more of this post

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

%d bloggers like this: