Category Archives: Creative Writing

Aasof on Poetry


This week on Facebook: The final selection is an article on the subject of poetry, if not entirely bringing an end to my respite from matters economic and political, at least giving myself a break from them during the August holiday month. The subject of literature is very much influenced by personal tastes, which is reflected in my choice of poems here.

Last week’s post on essays was probably the one area where the subjects of English Literature and English Grammar overlapped when I was at school. Teachers bent on finding a budding essayists or perhaps a poet, expected us all to wax lyrical over all things. Yet, perhaps, the agony of reading terrible essays in English Grammar was nothing compared to the gauche attempts at poetry made in English Literature. I suspect that it was poetry that caused the unwilling writer and the unfortunate reader the most distress. Read more of this post

Aasof on Essays


This week on Facebook: Following last week’s offering on books I have turned to essays this week and finding myself with too many articles my week on Facebook has forced me to make another choice. The week is given over mainly to articles from contemporary female essayists with one male contributor, whose article on Monday — Why the essay still matters — begins this week on Facebook. Essayist Christy Wampole begins the female contributions on Tuesday with — The Essayification of Everything — in what the New York Times classifies as a blog. Wampole writes: It seems that, even in the proliferation of new forms of writing and communication before us, the essay has become a talisman of our times. What is behind our attraction to it? Is it the essay’s therapeutic properties? Because it brings miniature joys to its writer and its reader? Because it is small enough to fit in our pocket, portable like our own experiences?
Read more of this post

Aasof on Books


This week on Facebook: Follows on from the one I posted last week on cartoons and being more than just cartoons, I deciding to put the 35 funniest cartoons about ebooks and digital reading here. The access to books and ebooks¹²³ these days is phenomenal, but I do remember when it wasn’t always so and conditional on access to a good library. With technology offering access to digitised books through websites like Project Gutenberg, The Library of Congress and Project Muse, a new world has been opened. But where to start this post? Perhaps the blacklisting of Winnie the Pooh in China is a good place, especially as the article was really an homage to the bicentennial of Jane Austen’s death. Read more of this post

Aasof on Cartoons


This week on Facebook: This week’s post on cartoons is prompted by Monday’s article on Peanuts Philosophies but if you click on the link Charles Schulz claims that it was humour and not philosophy that led to the creation of his cartoon characters in Peanuts. I hold the view that a cartoonist must also be a philosopher, perhaps even (as one cartoonist claims) an epistemologist. I intended a single post on literature but when, like Topsy, it had grown to include cartoons, books, essays and poetry I decided to spend a week on each of them all. This week is cartoons and includes those that have historically appeared in newspapers or satirical magazines, it also includes a talk on the history of British cartoons and caricature.  Read more of this post

On approaching 80


This week of Facebook: Is pure self-indulgence — a birthday present to myself if you will — I was born on Sunday 21 May 1939 and today I became 78 years old. I shall be 84 and then 89 the next time my birthday falls on a Sunday, which looks about as far ahead as I have planned the crop rotation in my garden.

As a change I have indulged myself with an advance of my own articles (reprises) that didn’t have a social media, political or economic theme. Finding them turned out to be quite difficult but 20012 was a good year for this. Since then I have (perhaps) become increasingly curmudgeonly. I was surprised — although I shouldn’t have been — at the influence of rhyming verse! Read more of this post

Misleading Cases: Reprise


This week on Facebook: It occurs to me in reading the misleading cases of A. P. Herbert that they are as relevant today as at the time they were written. Their context may be somewhat different and certainly society’s views on the freedom the individual are, but the law — far from being less oppressive — insidiously tightens its grip over individual freedoms. Read more of this post

2016 December Comments/Reviews/Thoughts

On Going Digital (TCWG) — 11/1/2017


I have long thought of producing an ebook, thinking that it must be a relatively easy thing to do and I’m sure that it is. Certainly it would be to  my grandchildren but I’m afraid an innate failing of mine being a short term attention span, which now coupled with practically zero short term memory for things that I rapidly lose interest in, is making it a difficult task. Do read with a very large element of acceptance of my ignorance on going digital Read more of this post

The Journal


The gun crew of SMS Nürnberg were relaxing, Franz was ignoring their idle banter using the moment’s respite to write in his journal: St Quentin Bay, November 24, 1914. Having finished coaling we are ready to round the Horn. The admiral has told the squadron that he would not make light of their situation, with the navies of the world allied against them a difficult task lay ahead. He and the captains would use their best endeavours to lead them safely home, if not for Christmas then the new year… . Read more of this post

The Harvest


Cryogenic Science Ltd was the UK subsidiary of DeepSleep Inc located in the USA and the only privately owned cryogenic facility in the UK. When DeepSleep filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy the financial collapse of Cryogenic Science was inevitable, CS Ltd was put into administration with the subsequent investigations revealing massive financial and technical mismanagement within the company. No members of CS Ltd’s board of directors were arrested and despite the obvious malfeasance that occurred, the former Chief Executive Officer and his Head of Research at CS were both allowed to returned unhindered to the USA. The government funded the restructuring of the company and incorporated it into the Ministry of Life Enhancement, otherwise known as MOLE, replacing the former CEO with a government appointee who immediately ordered that an attempted resuscitation was to be made of all the bodies and brains cryogenically frozen at CS under the directions his new Head of Research Dr Bethany Volcker. Read more of this post

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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