Category Archives: Creative Writing

A Christmas Carol — The End Of It.


Yes! and the bedpost was his own. The bed was his own, the room was his own. Best and happiest of all, the Time before him was his own, to make amends in!

“I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future!” Scrooge repeated, as he scrambled out of bed. “The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. Oh Jacob Marley! Heaven, and the Christmas Time be praised for this! I say it on my knees, old Jacob; on my knees!”

He was so fluttered and so glowing with his good intentions, that his broken voice would scarcely answer to his call. He had been sobbing violently in his conflict with the Spirit, and his face was wet with tears. Read more of this post

A Christmas Carol — The Last Of The Spirits.


The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently, approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery.

It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand. But for this it would have been difficult to detach its figure from the night, and separate it from the darkness by which it was surrounded.

He felt that it was tall and stately when it came beside him, and that its mysterious presence filled him with a solemn dread. He knew no more, for the Spirit neither spoke nor moved.

“I am in the presence of the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come?” said Scrooge. Read more of this post

A Christmas Carol — The Second Of The Three Spirits.


Awaking in the middle of a prodigiously tough snore, and sitting up in bed to get his thoughts together, Scrooge had no occasion to be told that the bell was again upon the stroke of One. He felt that he was restored to consciousness in the right nick of time, for the especial purpose of holding a conference with the second messenger despatched to him through Jacob Marley’s intervention. But finding that he turned uncomfortably cold when he began to wonder which of his curtains this new spectre would draw back, he put them every one aside with his own hands; and lying down again, established a sharp look-out all round the bed. For he wished to challenge the Spirit on the moment of its appearance, and did not wish to be taken by surprise, and made nervous. Read more of this post

A Christmas Carol — The First of The Three Spirits


When Scrooge awoke, it was so dark, that looking out of bed, he could scarcely distinguish the transparent window from the opaque walls of his chamber. He was endeavouring to pierce the darkness with his ferret eyes, when the chimes of a neighbouring church struck the four quarters. So he listened for the hour. Read more of this post

A Christmas Carol — Marley’s Ghost


Marley was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it: and Scrooge’s name was good upon ’Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to. Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail. Read more of this post

Lessons in Mandarin


Sunday on Facebook: Last week I posted a video from an interview with Zhang Weiwei on his book ‘The China Wave’ and an article from Zhang Weiwei on ‘Meritocracy versus Democracy’. They were both very informative, especially in promoting the idealism of the Chinese meritocratic system of government. I concluded that public administration in a meritocratic system of government differs very little from that of a demos driven democratic system, the differences lying in their notional definitions  democracy.

Written four years ago the following reprise is not entirely tongue in cheek but may well represent my innate cynicism that irrespective of the politics represented ‘mandarin‘, is not the purview of the Chinese. The following ‘Lessons in Mandarin’, may point to the inscrutability and clear consciousness of all (supposedly meaningful) exchanges.

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Friend (verb) — Christmas 2017


Finding proof for the word friend as a verb (other than my SOED) was difficult, but thanks to Megan Garber an article that she wrote for The Atlantic settled this for me (and perhaps a few others). As Megan writes in her (brief) article ‘friend,’ as a Verb, Is 800 Years Old adding, its use as verb is not the construction of FaceBook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg. I may add that one day a new verb ‘to zucker  may be added to the SOED and those falling prey to a social network scam can be said to have been ‘zuckered’. Read more of this post

Aasof on Poetry


This week on Facebook: The final selection is an article on the subject of poetry, if not entirely bringing an end to my respite from matters economic and political, at least giving myself a break from them during the August holiday month. The subject of literature is very much influenced by personal tastes, which is reflected in my choice of poems here.

Last week’s post on essays was probably the one area where the subjects of English Literature and English Grammar overlapped when I was at school. Teachers bent on finding a budding essayists or perhaps a poet, expected us all to wax lyrical over all things. Yet, perhaps, the agony of reading terrible essays in English Grammar was nothing compared to the gauche attempts at poetry made in English Literature. I suspect that it was poetry that caused the unwilling writer and the unfortunate reader the most distress. Read more of this post

Aasof on Essays


This week on Facebook: Following last week’s offering on books I have turned to essays this week and finding myself with too many articles my week on Facebook has forced me to make another choice. The week is given over mainly to articles from contemporary female essayists with one male contributor, whose article on Monday — Why the essay still matters — begins this week on Facebook. Essayist Christy Wampole begins the female contributions on Tuesday with — The Essayification of Everything — in what the New York Times classifies as a blog. Wampole writes: It seems that, even in the proliferation of new forms of writing and communication before us, the essay has become a talisman of our times. What is behind our attraction to it? Is it the essay’s therapeutic properties? Because it brings miniature joys to its writer and its reader? Because it is small enough to fit in our pocket, portable like our own experiences?
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Aasof on Books


This week on Facebook: Follows on from the one I posted last week on cartoons and being more than just cartoons, I deciding to put the 35 funniest cartoons about ebooks and digital reading here. The access to books and ebooks¹²³ these days is phenomenal, but I do remember when it wasn’t always so and conditional on access to a good library. With technology offering access to digitised books through websites like Project Gutenberg, The Library of Congress and Project Muse, a new world has been opened. But where to start this post? Perhaps the blacklisting of Winnie the Pooh in China is a good place, especially as the article was really an homage to the bicentennial of Jane Austen’s death. Read more of this post

Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

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Ed Conway

Blogs and charts and stuff

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Martin Widlake's Yet Another Oracle Blog

Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

Ed Conway

Blogs and charts and stuff

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

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