Cassandra on The Future?


This week on Facebook: My original posts on State Surveillance (2016) and that on Cash is subversive (2012) can still be read, however I recommend that you read the Snooper’s Charter (which became law in 2016) and the reference at¹.  You might also read Big Brother Loves You (which was posted in 2012) and the reference at². However, these are assumed liberties in which government policy (globally) to the Covid-19 pandemic has made the economic and environmental future even more uncertain.

I covered cash in my first post on Global Covid-19,

The world’s current governments didn’t really need an excuse to go on a spending spree. But in the coronavirus epidemic, they’ve now got one. Expect to be showered with cash. Coronavirus is the ideal excuse for governments to blow the budget

 And my second post on Covid-19 global consequences stated that liberties have been trashed:

Our most dearly held liberties have been trashed and not with a great battle, but with barely a whimper. Freedom is on the line right now, and if people value it they will need to fight for it. Freedom is on the line in this lockdown

In my third post, the following is an extract from my post Covid-19 Pandemics & Politics regarding surveillance by the State:

All states, democratic or authoritarian, will likely become surveillance states. The pandemic will give states even more reason to render their citizens’ actions, movements, histories and economic activities transparent to them. Coronavirus politics and the pandemic

From my March (2020) post UK — Electoral Naiveté imagine if:

High levels of educational attainment, praising the communist party on social media, and socially useful activities such as taking care of elderly family members, or helping the poor. Bad deeds that lose you points include drink-driving convictions or trying to bribe an official. Crucially, citizens will be judged by the company they keep, losing points for being friends with low-scorers. The idea, then, is to build a self-reinforcing system that doesn’t rely on constant surveillance, but rather on self-censorship and positive reinforcement. Many of the elements for the scheme are in place already: vast databases, intensive digital surveillance, systems of social reward and punishment and an entrenched culture of state paternalism. A credit score that judges your politics.

China is pioneering a system of social control that monitors your trustworthiness. India is a step away from something similar. Could “social credit” come to Britain too? Each step that I have taken has led to posts has drawn me deeper into the internet and particularly that associated with social media. This leads me to question the self-interest of humanity and what it actually means!

Since personal liberty was a good to be preserved, it followed that self-regarding actions were wholly outside the proper sphere of the State. One’s liberty could only reasonably be curtailed in order to protect the liberty of others, it could never be the right coercion for ones own good. Could it really be assumed utterly wrong in all circumstances to restrain one’s actions for the sake of safe-guarding what is purely self-interest? Liberty And Law

Deep fakes, surveillance, and the future of the internet: Dutch Futurist Ruud Hendriks speaks to The World about what he calls “scary” developments in today’s technology – from the slow nationalisation of the internet, to the virtual world’s gradual (and extremely vivid) merge with reality.

Since 1 October 1949, China has been run by one party – the Communist Party of China. The party has led the country from the era of Chairman Mao to become the economic powerhouse is it today, but along the way has tolerated no opposition and quashed dissent. How the Communist Party runs the country

It seems that the State is prepared to take whatever steps it deems necessary to protect itself against perceived acts of dissidence, and that the State may decide whether or not any such action would be against what it would call its democratic system³. The State will choose to counter this dissidence by reacting to you and your social credit score on an internet that it has nationalised. On doing away with cash and the increase in cctv surveillance, reinforces my view of the future will change of rule of democracy to that of global authoritarianism (5). State surveillance, a cashless society, a social credit system and a State controlled internet are the clear political intentions implicit in remarks made about Covid-19.


 A Future Without Cash (5:21 min) Many countries are going cashless at great speed. What are the advantages of ditching hard cash and what are the dangers?

In Your Face (5.19 min): China has been building what it calls “the world’s biggest camera surveillance network”. Across the country, 170 million CCTV cameras are already in place and an estimated 400 million new ones will be installed in the next three years.

Social Credit Score (8.oo min): NBC’s Janis Mackey Frayer goes inside the factories making facial recognition scanners that track the movements and communities experimenting with China’s social credit system.

 

Why China’s New Dystopian Social Credit Score is So Popular (5.49 min): Rebecca Watson is the founder of the Skepchick Network, a collection of sites focused on science and critical thinking. She has written for outlets such as Slate, Popular Science, and the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry.

5. Why Privacy Matters (20.41 min): Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States’ extensive surveillance of private citizens. In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.”


Referenced Articles Books & Definitions:

  • A bold text subscript above and preceding a title below (¹·²·³), refers to a book, pdf, podcast, video, slide show and a download url that is usually free.
  • Brackets containing a number e.g. (1) reference a particular included article (1-5).
  • A link (url), which usually includes the title, are to an included source.
  • The intended context of words, idioms, phrases, have their links in italics.
  • A long read url* (when used below) is followed by a superscript asterisk.
  • Occasionally Open University (OU) free courses are cited.
  • JSTOR lets you set up a free account allowing you to have 6 (interchangeable) books stored that you can read online.

¹The State Of Surveillance: (pdf) The extraordinary scale of surveillance in 2018 Britain affects all of us. Privacy is fast becoming a relic of the pre-internet age. We live in a time where our every step can be, and often is, recorded. Whilst the world’s largest companies are pro ting from tracking, analysing and quantifying every ‘consumer’, the state is building the most totalitarian style surveillance regime of any democracy in history under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016.

²Cashless Society – The Future of Money or a Utopia? (url/download) In recent years we have witnessed a growing trend in cashless transactions as well as products and services sold exclusively in this way. Also, after the onset of the global financial crisis, private crypto currencies appeared that have raised some concerns. All of these changes beg the question of whether modern societies are moving towards a cashless society. This also raises a number of other dilemmas such as whether cashless societies have negative implications, whether they have what should be the response of economic policymakers, who would be potential winners and losers, and the like.

³Protecting human rights in an age of mass surveillance: (pdf) Governments can have legitimate reasons for using communications surveillance, for example to combat crime or protect national security. However because surveillance interferes with the rights to privacy and freedom of expression, it must be done in accordance with strict criteria: surveillance must be targeted, based on reasonable suspicion, undertaken in accordance with the law, necessary to meet a legitimate aim and be conducted in a manner that is proportionate to that aim, and non-discriminatory. This means that mass surveillance that indiscriminately collects the communications of large numbers of people cannot be justified. Mass surveillance violates both the right to privacy and to freedom of expression.

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Oracle performance, Oracle statistics and VLDBs

The Land Is Ours

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The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

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