Aasof on the death of social media!


This week on Facebook: I was quite surprised at the time that I have given over to posts on the social-media. In 2016 I wrote in A Hall of Mirrors that those advocates of digital freedom claimed to have clear missions about their defence of free speech or freedom of expression, any ethos of intent in their mission would seem to be lost in the public’s use of social-media.

To paraphrase Mark Twain’s remark: any report of the death of social media is an exaggeration. Launched in 2008 The Conversation Prism is a visual map of the social media landscape that tracks dominant and promising social networks and organises them by how they’re used in everyday life.

A dominant company like Facebook, particularly one that is offering a vertically integrated “one-stop-shop” for election services, is in a historically unique position, and as a foreign company it is a position that if left unchecked will be corrosive of trust and democratic legitimacy. Social media power and election legitimacy

I do not think that social-media is dying but what it is, or what it is assumed to be, is representative of a notion in the very brief experiment with western democracy¹. I think that social media is evolving, and it is likely to evolve into something intended to increase the servitude of those who espouse a democracy. I do believe that it will evolve into an undemocratic system that will act in the interests of the politicians and seek to increase their political power. Much like it is already doing in China.

The following articles add to those that I posted in 2016 in my post on ‘An Internet Brief‘, which covers my thoughts on the development of the internet and it its future. To those thoughts are now added the Chinese model of internet surveillance, the model favoured by the political elites regardless of their affiliations. A model leading to unfettered State control over the use of the internet, reductions in democracy and State authoritarianism. A Golden Shield and A Great Cannon

The view that social media is dying may well lead to a model that is transparent to authoritarian State surveillance. However social media, as indicated by The Conversation Prism, has never been a trend setter. It’s really the ‘Darknet’ that provides those intimate chats² between real friends. Not by someone who may be a notional friend only and yet has the capability of giving away your email address to added notional friends (e.g. Facebook). An authoritarian State will deny access to Darknet, but as Jamie Bartlett has recently argued in a new e-book ‘Orwell Versus the Terrorists’ the answer, he suggests, is not to remove everyone’s ability to stay hidden online: it’s to develop new more targeted techniques to get at the bad guys.

It allows us to address and raise sensitive information without giving away too much about ourselves. It means we can browse the net without fear of hackers learning our IP address.  That’s not to say there aren’t problems.The cost is that some people will misuse it, otherwise known as life in a liberal democracy. The ‘Darknet’ is dangerous. It’s also deeply democratic


1. Social Media Is Dying: The term social media has become outdated, and this applies to most other social platforms too, such as Snapchat, which are more focused on ad-revenue than improving interactions within the app. Nothing about Facebook, in its current iteration, is social because the company has an increasing interest in video which has led to a drastic change in the focus of the platform. The so-called social media is now a complete misnomer because interactions between people are evidently no longer these companies’ focus; they are preoccupied by investments and ad-revenue.

2. This Is Why Social Media Is On Its Way Out: One of my favourite stories is the story of Ray Kroc. When Ray Kroc, the founder of McDonald’s, asked what business he was in, most people said, “You’re in the hamburger business”. But Ray Kroc said, “No, I am not in the hamburger business. I’m in the real estate business”. And that’s exactly what Facebook is. Facebook is not in the social media business. They’re in the data mining business. And that’s what they do.

3. Importance and Benefits of Social Media in Today’s World: Social media has evolved from being cyber world geek buzz to a massive platform for businesses, entrepreneurs, professionals and organizations that seek greater recognition and identification at a very economical price. Social media has its claws deeply dug in the cyber world and failing to acknowledge that, and not take advantage of its influential powers, is a crime unforgivable.

4. Why the Era of Social Media Is Due to Come to an End: As far as what exactly it’s doing to the brains, we have some potential answers. First of all, social media use can become an addiction, say scientists from Nottingham Trent University , whose study concludes by saying “it may be plausible to speak specifically of ‘Facebook Addiction Disorder’”. They refer to how for some people heavy Facebook use can lead to neglecting their personal life, escapism and mood alterations programs.

5. What Is Social Media? Just what exactly is social media, anyway? The term is so vague that it can basically be used to describe almost any website on the internet today. Or can it? Some people have more of a restricted view of social media, often equating it to mean the same as social networking (a.k.a. Facebook, Twitter, etc.). Other people don’t consider blogs to fall under the social media category. It seems as if everyone has their own personal opinion of what social media is and isn’t.


Referenced Articles Books & Definitions:

  • A bold text subscript above and preceding a title below (¹·²·³), refers to a book, pdf, podcast, video, slide show and a download url that is usually free.
  • Brackets containing a number e.g. (1) reference a particular included article (1-5).
  • A link (url), which usually includes the title, are to an included source.
  • The intended context of words, idioms, phrases, have their links in italics.
  • A long read url* (when used below) is followed by a superscript asterisk.
  • Occasionally Open University (OU) free courses are cited.
  • JSTOR lets you set up a free account allowing you to have 6 (interchangeable) books stored that you can read online.

¹Are Western democracies becoming ungovernable? (url): Ungovernability can be thought of in four ways. No Western country is ungovernable in every one. But there are a few features that exist in more than one country and a few countries that look ungovernable in more than one sense.

²Other trend publishers are in the dark: (url/download): People are increasingly sharing content through messaging apps, email, and other platforms that cannot be tracked by regular analytics software. The traffic generated through these shares show up as ‘direct’ but in truth their source is unknown.

 

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This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

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The Real Economy

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