The Future & AI


This week on Facebook: A video that I posted two week ago ended with the question, “What would you do if you never had to die?“. As someone who is going to be an octogenarian this year the question was an initial no-brainer, I would leap at the chance (especially if it repaired my short term memory failings at the same time). Then I began to think about what being human meant and the more I thought about it, the more my initial reaction began to change.

I began to think about human emotions and although these extend to the extremes and beyond in some humans, be those emotions good or bad, I am not sure that I  would wish to be devoid of human emotion, or to live in a world that was. The video above used the verb emote when referring to the replicant (or cyborg) returned to the parents, referring to the theatrical or superficial  portrayal of human emotions. I began to wonder if human emotions themselves were any more than an interplay — a creation of the brain as a result of previous responses — including those of empathy (3). For me this added a new dimension to the conversation between Harry and Sally leading to that famous scene.

In the past I have written about AI rather a lot, probably beginning in 2011. Although I would not have guessed at the time that the current critical stage of dysfunctional institutions and programs, introduced by todays progressive government lobbies, brought matters to the present crisis stage.

The fierce commitment of progressive lobbies today to dysfunctional institutions and programs has brought matters to a crisis stage: fierce attacks on anyone seeking to reform dysfunctional institutions combine with unreasoning devotion to unsustainable entitlements. Progressive Self Destruction (2011)

The videos associated with YEAR MILLION explore what it will be like to be human 1 million years from now but there is currently some debate about the singularity, which is suggested in episode 4/6 (humans becoming super intelligent cyborgs). Through illustrative, dramatic storytelling¹, YEAR MILLION (figuratively) paints a vision of humanity through the lens of a typical future American family, which includes a daughter who is part AI. The series propels us into an odyssey of unfathomable human choices² and predicts how every aspect of AI technology may affect our lives³.


1. The Guardian view on the future of AI:  Looking over the year that has passed, it is a nice question whether human stupidity or artificial intelligence has done more to shape events. Perhaps it is the convergence of the two that we really need to fear.

2. Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Humans: Experts say the rise of artificial intelligence will make most people better off over the next decade, but many have concerns about how advances in AI will affect what it means to be human, to be productive and to exercise free will.

3. What human emotions do we really want of artificial intelligence? Empathy: the ability to understand and share feelings of another — was top of the list of desirable human qualities that day, perhaps because it goes beyond mere recognition (“I see you are angry”) and demands a response that demonstrates an appreciation of emotional impact.

4. What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere? Will robots become self-aware? Will they have rights? Will they be in charge? Here are five scenarios from our future dominated by AI.

5. Our emotional responses to AI and the danger of a backlash: When faced with the prospect of Artificial Intelligence, we tend to respond strongly emotionally. AI captures the collective imagination – it feels new, unknown, exciting and scary. Our reactions tap into a shared set of cultural beliefs and expectations dating back to the first Industrial Revolution when we were faced with a profoundly alienating new environment.


Referenced Articles Books & Definitions:

  • A bold text subscript above and preceding a title below (¹·²·³), link to (usually free) content.
  • Links (without superscript) and in italics reference the intended context of words used.
  • Links without superscript and not in italics reference a source.
  • A long read url* is followed by a superscript asterisk.
  • Brackets containing a number reference a particular included article (1-5).
  • Occasionally Open University (OU) free courses are cited.
  • JSTOR lets you set up a free account allowing you to have 6 (interchangeable) books stored that you can read online.

¹Benefits & Risks Of Artificial Intelligence: Everything we love about civilisation is a product of intelligence, so amplifying our human intelligence with artificial intelligence has the potential of helping civilisation flourish like never before — as long as we manage to keep the technology beneficial.

²Artificial Intelligence and its Role in Near Future (pdf): Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the property of machines, computer programs and systems to perform the intellectual and creative functions of a person, independently find ways to solve problems, be able to draw conclusions and make decisions.

³The Moment When Humans Lose Control Of AI: This is the way the world ends: not with a bang, but with a paper clip. In this scenario, the designers of the world’s first artificial superintelligence need a way to test their creation. So they program it to do something simple and non-threatening: make paper clips.

 

 

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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