China Brazil a perspective


This week on Facebook: I  often publish pieces that I am sure will be of little interest to whomsoever may read my articles, and so it is with this piece that I was drawn by some remarks that were made to me. I have written elsewhere about China’s ‘Belt and Road’ initiative and made frequent references to the Chinese Premier Xi Jinping. I am of the view that the Western World who — when they think about non-fictional history all — have a superior attitude regarding their global influence. This may have been justified prior to the advances in technology, essentially computerisation, the internet and other advances in IT, but not any longer.

Those States that either reject or are ejected from the Pax Americana¹ now seeks succour outside of US hegemony. The world is changing, globally new economies are emerging that are competing with the Western World for greater share of global profits. China is no exception, never having lost its ‘greatness’ (certainly in terms of its cultural history), it is rapidly rising as a global power financially, militarily and particularly politically.

The Western World is somewhat complacent, putting their faith in liberal democracies — albeit meritocratic — governments overcoming the single political party meritocracy advocated by China. Politically the Western World’s, political classes are moving inexorably towards the meritocratic system of government advocated by China. Kevin Rudd’s analysis of Xi Jinping and a meritocratic global governance may well be right with a China Brazil² pact being the first step in seeking to undermine the USA’s global hegemony.

China Brazil: Far Away, So Close — click image


1 China Targets Brazil as Strategic Partner in the Midst of Global Trade War: On the Chinese investor map Brazil stands out as the only country of continental dimensions that doesn’t have political, border or sovereignty hindrances compared to countries like Russia, India and the United States, according to analysts.

2 China’s Strategic Play in Brazil: Brazil could use a cash injection. It has only barely started to recover from three years of economic recession and the government is rapidly putting major public assets on the auction block. Chinese acquisitions are set to both expand and diversify into new sectors.

3 Chinese money pours into Brazil as US trade war bites, with US$54 billion across 100 projects: China is Brazil’s biggest trading partner. From 2003 to June this year, Chinese firms have invested almost US$54 billion in around 100 projects in Brazil, according to figures from Brazil’s planning ministry.

4 Who will win a US-China trade war? Maybe Brazil: Today, Brazil lacks the infrastructure of rail lines and port facilities needed to easily move crops from farm to faraway customers. Chinese investment could fix that problem.

5 Brazil must urgently learn how to operate in a more China-centric world: Growing tensions between the West and China offer a world of opportunities for Brazil if it can learn how to navigate in this new geopolitical environment. Yet at a recent gathering of China watchers in Brasília, participants from government, academia and the private sector openly agreed that Brazil lacked a clear strategy vis-à-vis China.


Referenced Articles & Books:

A book or pdf (usually free), or simply a url that may sometimes link to a download that is also usually free. A superscript on the bracketed book, pdf, url, refers to the article (1-5) that it can be found in.

Sometimes a link to JSTOR is used, this lets you set up a free account allowing you to have 6 (interchangeable) books stored that you can read online.

¹The US–Chinese power shift and the end of the Pax Americana (pdf): Unless the United States can adjust gracefully to this tectonic geopolitical shift, the chances of a Sino-American war are high—as they always are during power transitions. However, whether change comes peacefully or violently, the Pax Americana’s days are numbered.

²Brazil and China: South-South Partnership or North-South Competition (pdf)? Even with advantageous trade relations, there is a pattern of growing imbalances and asymmetries in trade flows that are more favourable to China than Brazil. Therefore, Brazil and China are bound to be competitors, but it is not clear how bilateral imbalances may affect multilateral cooperation between the two countries.

One response to “China Brazil a perspective

  1. Pingback: The Economics of Luxury Goods | Aasof’s Reflections

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The Land Is Ours

a Landrights campaign for Britain

The Bulletin

This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

TCWG Short Stories

Join our monthly competition and share story ideas...

The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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