Nanny State UK


The inexorable rise of the Nanny State explains the raison d’être of the political class. The sentiments expressed below in The Traveller; or, a Prospect of Society  are particularly true today. Although written by Oliver Goldsmith in 1764, the law has increasingly become a vehicle for restraint by the State¹·²·³.

In every government, though terrors reign,
Though tyrant kings, or tyrant laws restrain,
How small, of all that human hearts endure,
That part which laws or kings can cause or cure!

 Video Time 4min 38sec

Total Video Time 47 min 4 sec — Brendan o’Neil in Australia

  • The Menzies Research Centre: 12 min 30 sec
  • The Independent Man Part 1 @ 12 min 30 sec
  • The Independent Man Part 2 @ 22 min 26 sec


Referenced Articles & Books: A book or pdf (usually free), or simply a url that may sometimes link to a download that is also usually free. Sometimes a link to JSTOR is used, this lets you set up a free account allowing you to have 6 (interchangeable) books stored that you can read online.

¹Keep Britain Tidy: And Other Posters from the Nanny State (url): This collection of public information posters from the period 1945-75 is published in conjunction with the National Archives, where the original posters are located. The posters provide a fascinating insight into the policies and priorities of successive postwar governments, covering everything from the jobs people did, the food they ate, the amount of alcohol they drank and cigarettes they smoked to the wearing of motorcycle helmets and seat belts, road safety for children and keep Britain tidy campaigns.

²The Nanny State (url): What an experiment in state-sponsored parenting says about British politics:

For although taking children from their parents may sometimes be the least bad thing to do, the government is, in aggregate, a deadbeat, feckless parent. Children who have been in care are 50 times more likely to go to prison than those who have not, according to calculations by Policy Exchange, a think-tank. They are also 66 times more likely to see their own children taken into care. This is not for lack of money: the average bill for taking a child under the state’s wing is £38,000 ($61,400) per year. Better, then, to employ a latter-day Mary Poppins to nanny a family into staying together.

³The Nudge Unit (url): Since the Behavioural Insights Team was created in 2010, there has been considerable media interest in the team’s work. Often referring to the team as ‘the Nudge Unit’ (after the work of Professor Richard Thaler, co-author of Nudge and academic advisor to the team), much of the media interest has focused on the influence the team has had within Whitehall and overseas; and the methods and insights that the team has applied to public policy.

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This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

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The Real Economy

Blogs and stuff from Ed Conway

Public Law for Everyone

Professor Mark Elliott

Bleda

Am I my Brothers keeper?

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