Brain Plasticity


This week on Facebook: I have written elsewhere about brain training and memory, informing  readers that the average short term memory, as propounded by George Miller, can hold 7 ± 2 (5 to 9) chunks or bits of information, whereas I now believe that mine is 0 ± 1. This is something my wife has always believed and insists on giving me written lists. Having read the works of Edward De Bono on useful techniques to enhance memory retention, whatever techniques I learned I have now forgotten as my wife always gives me a list.

My interest in brain plasticity was aroused by reading the article that I posted on Monday. Contrary to what we may have been taught in the past, the brain does not start dying when we reach 21 years old the answer lies in your treatment of it, but read about synaptic pruning.

Wednesday’s article was an enlightening example of how the frontiers of medical science are now being opened by an increasing understanding of how the brain works. Friday’s article  is effectively a summary of the week, if you wish to go any deeper into the subject of brain plasticity then you could begin by reading the pdf papers¹²³ included below the articles.

The 2 videos posted on Tuesday and Thursday are self explanatory and both worth watching. Tuesday’s video  effectively shows what plasticity is and how it is formed. Thursday’s video is an interesting talk by Dr Lara Boyd on how we can use this relatively new concept to help people (especially stroke victims) and of those new frontiers in medical science associated with The Brain:


Monday 24 October 2016 Health Check: does brain training make you smarter? Sceptics argue that brain-training studies claiming to demonstrate significant effects lack more general applicability and have shown only very specific kinds of improvement. Meanwhile, proponents of brain training argue studies failing to demonstrate effects employ flawed approaches, including unsatisfactory application of recommended methods.

Tuesday 25 October 2016 

Wednesday 26 October 2016 Study reveals why the brain can’t forget amputated limbs, even decades laterUsing ultra-high resolution imaging, researchers from Oxford University have been able to examine the brains of amputees to see how their brains change following the loss of an arm. Seeing the brain at this level of detail has revealed for the first time that amputees’ brains retain an incredibly detailed map of the missing hand and individual fingers. The existence of this detailed hand map in the brain — decades after amputation — could be part of the explanation of the phantom limb phenomenon.

Thursday 27 October 2016

Friday 28 October 2016 What is brain plasticity and why is it so important? We continue to have the ability to learn new activities, skills or languages even into old age. This retained ability requires the brain to have a mechanism available to remember so that knowledge is retained over time for future recall.


¹ Brain Plasticity pdf

One response to “Brain Plasticity

  1. Pingback: Forgetfulness! | Aasof’s Reflections

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This site was created for members and friends of My Telegraph blog site, but anyone is welcome to comment, and thereafter apply to become an author.

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The Real Economy

Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music

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Professor Mark Elliott

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Am I my Brothers keeper?

An Anthology of Short Stories

Selected by other writers

davidgoodwin935

The Short Stories of David Goodwin (Capucin)

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