They think it’s all over – it is now!


Today the American presidential election is over and if my indifference causes offence to any readers in the USA, it is quite unintentional. I’m sure that that we could happily trade insults over one’s indifference to to the other’s ‘affairs of state’. That isn’t quite true of course; the United States’ influence on world affairs far exceeds the arrogant presumptions of those European nations (Britain and France) who also sit on the UN Security Council.  To say that the UK and the USA are ‘two nations divided by a common language’ is perhaps trite, but taken beyond any of its original humorous intentions,  it nevertheless points to divisions in understanding. It may be that one of our greatest divisions is any common understanding of what we mean, or intend, a ‘democracy’ to be.

An article published yesterday by Forbes, with the title Look, Up In The Sky! It’s A Bird, It’s A Plane, It’s Congressman!, includes an extract from H.L. Mencken’s essays the Last Words (written in 1926, considerably before his actual last words). Mencken, the Sage of Baltimore, was at base a great populist humanitarian.  Mencken’s words on democracy may provide us with a common understanding. He summed up the fundamental predicament in the following:

I have alluded somewhat vaguely to the merits of democracy. One of them is quite obvious: it is, perhaps, the most charming form of government ever devised by man. The reason is not far to seek. It is based upon propositions that are palpably not true and what is not true, as everyone knows, is always immensely more fascinating and satisfying to the vast majority of men than what is true. Truth has a harshness that alarms them, and an air of finality that collides with their incurable romanticism. … The mob man, functioning as citizen, gets a feeling that he is really important to the world – that he is genuinely running things. Out of his maudlin herding after rogues and mountebanks there comes to him a sense of vast and mysterious power—which is what makes archbishops, police sergeants, the grand goblins of the Ku Klux and other such magnificoes happy. And out of it there comes, too, a conviction that he is somehow wise, that his views are taken seriously by his betters – which is what makes United States Senators, fortune tellers and Young Intellectuals happy. Finally, there comes out of it a glowing consciousness of a high duty triumphantly done which is what makes hangmen and husbands happy.

All these forms of happiness, of course, are illusory. They don’t last. The democrat, leaping into the air to flap his wings and praise God, is for ever coming down with a thump. The seeds of his disaster, as I have shown, lie in his own stupidity: he can never get rid of the naive delusion – so beautifully Christian – that happiness is something to be got by taking it away from the other fellow. But there are seeds, too, in the very nature of things: a promise, after all, is only a promise, even when it is supported by divine revelation, and the chances against its fulfillment may be put into a depressing mathematical formula. Here the irony that lies under all human aspiration shows itself: the quest for happiness, as always, brings only unhappiness in the end. But saying that is merely saying that the true charm of democracy is not for the democrat but for the spectator. That spectator, it seems to me, is favoured with a show of the first cut and calibre. Try to imagine anything more heroically absurd! What grotesque false pretenses! What a parade of obvious imbecilities! What a welter of fraud! But is fraud unamusing? … Go into your praying-chamber and give sober thought to any of the more characteristic democratic inventions: say, Law Enforcement. Or to any of the typical democratic prophets: say, the late Archangel Bryan. If you don’t come out paled and palsied by mirth then you will not laugh on the Last Day itself, when Presbyterians step out of the grave like chicks from the egg, and wings blossom from their scapulae, and they leap into interstellar space with roars of joy.

I enjoy democracy immensely. … Does it exalt dunderheads, cowards, trimmers, frauds, cads? Then the pain of seeing them go up is balanced and obliterated by the joy of seeing them come down. Is it inordinately wasteful, extravagant, dishonest? Then so is every other form of government: all alike are enemies to laborious and virtuous men. Is rascality at the very heart of it? Well, we have borne that rascality since 1776, and continue to survive. In the long run, it may turn out that rascality is necessary to human government, and even to civilization itself – that civilization, at bottom, is nothing but a colossal swindle. (H.L. Mencken)

2 responses to “They think it’s all over – it is now!

  1. Pingback: Voting For Democracy? | Aasof getting serious!

  2. Pingback: Voting For Democracy? – Aasof - My Telegraph

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