Movie Moments Part I

This week on Facebook: I thought that I might take a break by posting 5 of my favourite scenes from movies that I would watch again. It turned out to be much harder than I expected  in choosing and finding a favourite scene on the net. I have called this piece part I because there are so many remembered scenes from movies that I decided to repeat this theme at some future date. In some movies there are many scenes and in others while the movie is memorable a selected a scene from it is not. So here are my 5 scenes for Part I (in no particular order). Read more of this post

Men in Black

Sir James Faulkner QC regarded juries with disdain, thinking the uneducated hoi-palloi who now sat on them as being incapable of grasping the finer points of common law and particularly those involving finance and economics. Nevertheless, he had just delivered what he considered to be a flawless case for the prosecution. His innate hubris convincing him that the lucid presentation and eloquence of his delivery must surely have convinced even the simplest mind on the jury of the defendant’s guilt. Sitting down he brushed the front of his gown, a preening habit he had developed since taking the silk, smiling self assuredly whilst nodding to The Honourable Mr Justice Pettigrew, confident that he had impressed the judge. In his own mind at least, the outcome of the trial in his favour was assured.

Aware that the jury shared his ennui after having endured such a marathon delivery Mr Justice Pettigrew looked at the pocket watch that he always placed on the bench before him, relieved that it indicated a suitable time for him to call an adjournment until the following morning.
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2016 September Comments/Reviews/Thoughts

Having read all the stories this month and being surprised by the variation in them, I decided to look again at flash-fiction and what it was all about. Read more of this post

Fleeced Again!

This week on Facebook: Being somewhat surprised by the scale of the political incompetence (although political connivance would fit equally well) that I came across in last week’s article on pensions, I decided that this week I would look a little deeper. I found that the sorry saga continues with perhaps the only positive slant that could be put on it would be that of politicians caring for their own stipends.  Read more of this post

A Golden Fleece?

This week on Facebook: As a pensioner it isn’t inevitable that I should have an interest in pensions, like most people I am only really interested in the limitations that my income has on my lifestyle. I do however find myself increasingly incensed by the seeming insularity that today’s society bestows on those a lot wealthier than me, then why should they ignore the advice that you should never to look a gift horse in the mouth anymore than I would. In deciding to post some articles on UK pensions it seems that I stepped into a minefield, one in which the mines were planted by the government. Read more of this post

2016 Banned Books Week USA

Sunday on Facebook: It is over two years since I wrote a piece to coincide with Banned Books Week in the USA. Rather than focus on books that are banned — particularly in the USA and the UK — I decided on two examples of books modified to satisfy a modern readership and one book as an allegory for internet censorship, which may pose an even greater threat to personal freedom. Finally making reference to how state censorship grows in proportion to the public’s access to information, the post itself being an indication of why internet freedom to publish material is so important.

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Points about Hinkley

This week on Facebook: A conversation with a friend drew my attention to Hinkley Point and the cost. In researching the cost of what is termed Hinkley Point C nuclear reactor the estimated construction costs alone are running at £18 billion and rising. Finding an estimated overall project cost on Hinkley Point C nuclear reactor — from conception to decommissioning — is very difficult as those financially involved in the project are quite coy about pricing. Read more of this post

Inequality & Gini Lorenz

This week on Facebook: An acquaintance found himself embroiled in discussions about (essentially) wealth distribution in the developed and developing word. This is an area fraught with statistical analysis — mostly written in support of a particular issue — and usually extremely biased. Read more of this post

Java Lava

This morning may not have been déjà vu exactly, rather a replay of a bad experience with coffee machines. Having discovered that my consumption of strong black coffee is not good for me, I decided to confine myself to one or perhaps two cups a day and put away my cafetière. No not a café owner that’s a cafetier as in cafeteria and not to be confused with cafetière (to the French, the Islington set and me, L’accent grave et l’accent aigu are important). This reminds me of one of my favourite German anecdotes about a colleague who confused Taube, the German for pigeon, with Traube which is German for grape, and asked a neighbour if he had lost a grape as an injured one had just flown into his garden. Read more of this post

Helicopter Money

This week on Facebook: Sees me return to economics, yet more history and the despair of an old man who — like all old men before me — thinks that the world is going to hell in a handcart. My first instinct was to ignore articles on helicopter money as it being something that I was incapable of having an influence on (which is true) and finding myself totally confused by the rationales offered by economists and politicians. Nevertheless, the notion of helicopter money made me think of some historic precedents that I believe are valid allusions to its use. Read more of this post

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Hello, I’m Ed Conway, Economics Editor of Sky News, and this is my website. Blogposts, stuff about my books and a little bit of music


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